#Steve-Potts

tag

Product Shout Out: Steve Potts 33oz Bottles

Radar

Product Shout Out: Steve Potts 33oz Bottles

Sometimes we find a product that improves the quality of our rides yet is so simple that it doesn’t merit a thorough review, and for those products, we’ve got our Product Shout Out.

If you find yourself with a full suspension mountain bike, or any bike for that matter, with only a single bottle cage, then check out these nifty 33oz Steve Potts water bottles made by SOMA in the USA. I’ve been using this bottle for a while now and it’s proven to be a worthy companion for my upper mountain and back country rides. I’ll pair it with a trail water filter; it’ll be more than enough for an afternoon ride. What’s nice about these bottles, versus other similar products, is the indention around the middle of the bottle, allowing a cage to grab onto it. I use a Voile strap for extra security on the rowdy stuff. These bottles are BPA free, feature the Steve Potts Logo, and retail for $14 a piece.

I bought mine from Sincere Cycles here in Santa Fe but you can pick one up at the Steve Potts Webshop. As for the Radavist Rune Voile straps, those are in stock at our Webshop.

From The Pro’s Closet: 1987 Steve Potts Signature

Reportage

From The Pro’s Closet: 1987 Steve Potts Signature

This entry from The Pro’s Closet museum is my personal favorite bike I’ve shot thus far. It’s not often you find such a clean and pristine example of a 1980s Potts Signature, complete with WTB dirt drops, a LD stem, and a full WTB/Suntour Grease Guard kit. Today we’re stoked to feature this gem with words by the Vintage MTB Workshop‘s Tasshi Dennis so read on below for more!

From The Pro’s Closet: 1988 WTB Wildcat Prototype

Reportage

From The Pro’s Closet: 1988 WTB Wildcat Prototype

I’m sure most of you are familiar with WTB. They make tires, sealant, saddles, grips, and more, currently. Yet, WTB began as a much different brand, with its line of Grease Guard hubs, headsets, brakes, tires, forks, and yep, even bicycle frames! Started by Mark Slate, Steve Potts, and Charlie Cunningham, WTB has helped shape the mountain bike industry we know today. We already looked at the Banana Slug, which was used to display early WTB components and to showcase Steve Pott’s work but today we’ve got something different… One of the lesser-known WTB frames is the Wildcat, and today we look at a one-off prototype with words by Noah, a lifelong collector and fan of Wilderness Trail Bikes…

From the Pro’s Closet: Mark Slate’s 1983 WTB Steve Potts-Built ‘Banana Slug’

Reportage

From the Pro’s Closet: Mark Slate’s 1983 WTB Steve Potts-Built ‘Banana Slug’

Many of you are obviously familiar with the brand WTB, or Wilderness Trail Bikes. They make awesome tires, saddles, wheels, and other accessories but for a long time in the decade following the birth of mountain biking, they made all sorts of bicycle components including headsets, handlebars, bottom brackets, frames, and more. We reached out to Mark Slate, one of the founders of WTB for his thoughts on one of the most iconic bikes to leave the WTB and Steve Potts workshops: the Banana Slug, Steve Potts #45. I documented this wonderful dream bike – don’t you want one? – during a recent visit to the Pro’s Closet and am honored to have Mark’s thoughts on it here at the Radavist. Read on for Mark’s words and Steve’s handiwork below!

Steve Potts’ Mountain Type II R Rigid Fork and Gravel Fork Is a Perfect Upgrade for a Gravel, Mountain or Touring Bike

Radar

Steve Potts’ Mountain Type II R Rigid Fork and Gravel Fork Is a Perfect Upgrade for a Gravel, Mountain or Touring Bike

Say you’ve got an older mountain bike frame or a newer adventure-style bike with a threadless carbon fork but you really want a steel fork on it. Well, look no further. Steve Potts has taken his tried and true Type II fork design and broken it into two categories, a Mountain fork, and a Mini Gravel fork. Both of which have cargo bosses on the fork legs, that iconic sleeved unicrown design and thru-axles.  The retail for both forks is $500 a pop, which is not bad at all!

Mountain fork specs:
Chromoly construction:
Steer tube 1.125″ x 350 mm long, ( threadless)
IS disc mount
Everything pack mounts
Standard rack mount ( Pass and Stow, etc.)
12 mm x 100 mm thru – axle
Axle to crown: 419 mm
Rake: 47 mm
Stock color: Silver crown, black legs:
Will fit tires up to 75 mm x 736 mm tall, ( 27.5 ” x 3″ 0r 29 ” x 2.25″ )

Gravel fork specs:
Same chromoly specs as the Mountain Fork but with:
Axle to crown: 401 mm
Will fit tires up to 700c x 50 mm

See the full lineup at Steve Potts Cycles.

Steve Potts’ Personal Titanium All Road Bike

Reportage

Steve Potts’ Personal Titanium All Road Bike

Jumping back a bit here, to this Steve Potts that was on display at the Chris King Swarm event in Bend

Bikes like this stir the turd that is cycling purists’ perceptions about a lot of things. Take for instance, what the definition of “comfort” means, and truthfully, there is no finite, objective definition of the word “comfort.” Look at everyone from Grant Petersen to Coppi and you’ll see various approaches to cycling fit and enjoyment. Some road racers are more comfortable with enormous stems, slammed to the head tubes. Endurance bikepackers and record breakers often prefer the aero TT-style bar extensions for long hours on the bike. Meanwhile, even in mountain biking, bike fit and comfort varies from 110mm drop stems to 35mm ill lil shorty stems. What I’m trying to say is this is Steve Potts‘ personal titanium all-road bike and this is comfortable to him.

Now I have no idea how old Steve is, but he is one of the original 1970’s Repack renegades who is largely responsible for the sport known as “mountain biking.” He’s been building for over 35 years and to this day, develops some of the most intriguing designs I’ve seen to date. At first glance, this bike might look “weird” but when you lower your broad scope and refine your vision, you can see some truly unique and beautiful details here. Bear in mind, Steve’s fit is probably different than yours, and if you’re like me, I wonder what this bike would look like with a more race-fit geometry and sizing. Even the fork is a thing of mystery. Ask Steve about it next time you see him, he rambled off so many engineering numbers to me that I could barely wrap my head around his design process. In short, it flexes just enough to make even the most washboarded roads a little more comfortable… Hell, when I’m Steve’s age, I hope I’m still riding and I hope my bike looks like this!

____

Follow Steve Potts Bicycles on Instagram.

Whisky Parts Co’s Private Stock: Ben’s Rock Lobster and Steve Potts

Reportage

Whisky Parts Co’s Private Stock: Ben’s Rock Lobster and Steve Potts

Whisky Part’s Private Stock: Ben’s Rock Lobster and Steve Potts
Photos by Kyle Kelley, words by John Watson

Private Stock. A term reserved the best of the best when it comes to distilling American whiskey, Scotch whisky, and bourbon. For Whisky Parts Co, a brand within the umbrella that is Quality Bicycle Products, their aim is to design the best parts possible and get the most people using those parts as possible. Part of that comes from OE sales and the other brands within QBP using Whisky Parts when it makes sense, yet there is a growing demand from Domestic and International frame builders, to create products specifically for niche market requests. We’ve seen Whisky do so with their road, cross and mountain forks, as well as their wheels and components over the years.

For Ben Witt, Whisky’s marketing and sales director, he felt the need to not only embrace the niche market of frame building, but to use the parts for two of his own bikes; a Rock Lobster all-road and Steve Potts dirt drop mtb. We’ve seen a number of Private Stock builds from the Whisky team here on the Radavist over the years, but these two are some of the best.

Thanks to Ben for taking the time to let us showcase these bikes and Kyle for the great photos! My fingers are cold just typing this up!

____

Follow Kyle on Instagram and follow Whisky on Instagram.

2017 NAHBS: Steve Potts Silk Ti Soft Tail MTB with Suspension Rack

Reportage

2017 NAHBS: Steve Potts Silk Ti Soft Tail MTB with Suspension Rack

Each year at NAHBS, I like looking for innovative design solutions and this year, the bike that really resonated with me was this Steve Potts Silk Ti soft tail mountain bike. It’s got S&S couplers and a rear rack for touring. These days, you see nothing but bikepacking rigs for MTB tourers at NAHBS and on the internet, so seeing a ride like this is almost out of place. Then you look closer. Yes, the chainstays are made from a piece of laser-cut titanium, but check out the rack! Steve engineered a leaf-spring stabilizer on this rack, so when you hit a rough patch, the 1.75″ travel rear “shock” absorbs the terrain and this rack, due to its design, remains free of any jostling that might jettison your panniers onto the road or trail.

It’s hard to even begin to display how it works, but when you sit on the bike and compress the shock, the rack, with or without weight, keeps its normal height. Kooky? You bet. Smart? Uh huh. After all, this is NAHBS…