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Stefan Griebel and the Origin of the Colorado Trail Race – CTR

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Stefan Griebel and the Origin of the Colorado Trail Race – CTR

When I first heard about the Colorado Trail Race I was in fact riding part of the route, albeit one of the least engaging stretches. It was just ten days after I’d raced my bike for 200mi in Kansas and I’d been overly optimistic about my recovery when I’d agreed to a four-day tour from my home in Boulder through the South Platte (and on through Summit County) with my partner Tony.

Bedrock Sandals: Full Moon Rituals During the End of Times

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Bedrock Sandals: Full Moon Rituals During the End of Times

Our good friend Namz wrote a beautiful piece for Bedrock Sandals’ blog. Here’s an excerpt:

“Thunder Moon of July:
-I’m smiling a lot because my friend Sam is observing this one with me, all the way in another state. We both listen to N.K. Jemisin’s “The City We Became” to deepen our bond.
-Learn that the opposite of depression is not happiness but playfulness and remind myself to be a little more playful.
-Decided on wearing a linen cycling jumpsuit which allowed for airflow and a breeze all day (and I thought I looked really cute) but still wearing clipless cycling shoes and suffered pruned up, soggy feet at the end of the day.”

Head on over to Bedrock Sandals to read the whole piece!

A Look at Paul Component Engineering’s New Sprinter Van Wrap by Chris McNally

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A Look at Paul Component Engineering’s New Sprinter Van Wrap by Chris McNally

Paul Component Engineering has a lifelong legacy of making parts you can rely on, for just about any bike. This legacy is only possible due to the fact that the team at Paul live, eat, dream, drink, sleep, and travel for all things bike! Part of their tradeshow and bike race fleet is this Sprinter van, which recently got a facelift thanks to Chris McNally. Let’s take a look at this van’s new vinyl wrap in detail below.

Filmed by Bike: BIPOC Filmmaker Grant

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Filmed by Bike: BIPOC Filmmaker Grant

Filmed by Bike is pushing for a substantial BIPOC filmmaker grant to help Supporting Black, Indigenous and all People of Color tell their bicycle stories via video:

“We spend eight months of the year digging into the far-reaching corners of the internet in search of the world’s best bike movies. (Really, it’s not as scary of a place as you might think it is.) You know what we’ve learned over the years? The world is dreadfully devoid of films created by or about BIPOC.

That’s not to say the films aren’t out there, it’s just to say they are rare and precious gems – the quantity of which does not reflect the population of people who are passionate about riding bikes. We know there are many barriers to filmmaking, and funding is a huge barrier. So we decided to do our part to help bring more representation to the world of bike movies. We hope you’ll join us by applying for a grant, spreading the word about this program, and making a donation today.”

See more at Filmed by Bike and make a donation here if you have the means.

Cyclista Zine Instagram Live with Renee Hutchens for Indigenous Peoples Day

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Cyclista Zine Instagram Live with Renee Hutchens for Indigenous Peoples Day

Today at 4pm CT, Cyclista Zine is holding a discussion on Instagram Live with Renee Hutchens to commemorate Indigenous Peoples Day. Here’s what they will be discussing and if you’re interested, you should check it out:

“It’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Today is about more than just honoring and respecting Indigenous people, which we should do every day. Today we explicitly question and counter the story that conquering land gives you a right to it, that Native people only exist in the past, and that the future is inevitably a colonial one. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Outdoorspeople have long been avid tellers of this story. We love to use colonial and Columbian metaphors to describe what we do. Adventure. Discover. Conquer. Explore. #NeverStopExploring, right? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Today, and every day, let’s unequivocally reject this celebration of Columbus and the 528 years of violent exploration and adventure he represents. When we hike, when we climb, when we paddle, when we cycle, when we take and post pictures, whether in National Parks or in urban spaces, we must #StopExploring and acknowledge the land’s original stewards. Language is part of the struggle, part of defining who we are and what we do, so let’s be intentional. Stop exploring and learn to fight for an indigenous future. #publiclandisnativeland⠀⠀

Follow Cyclista Zine.⠀⠀⠀

Win a Purple Revel Ranger by Supporting Love Your Brain

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Win a Purple Revel Ranger by Supporting Love Your Brain

More than 3 million people in the US and Canada experience a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year. Revel is partnering up with Love Your Brain to improve their lives…

Every $5 donation to this campaign gets you one chance to win this custom-painted Rascal, built with quite the kit.

More about Love Your Brain:

Love Your Brain is a nonprofit on a mission to improve the lives of people affected by traumatic brain injury. We’ve teamed up with Revel Bikes because we believe:

-Through awareness and mindfulness, people are best equipped to make brain-healthy decisions (like wearing helmets when riding bikes!)
-When a TBI does occur, people affected need a supportive and compassionate community
-The experience of TBI is complex, unique, and often misunderstood, and needs to be seen, recognized, and supported by all

Donate $5 to be entered to win this Ranger at Love Your Brain.

Bikepacking Roots: BIPOC Bike Adventure Grant Applications are Open!

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Bikepacking Roots: BIPOC Bike Adventure Grant Applications are Open!

If you’re a BIPOC cyclist, who enjoys bikepacking, or perhaps you’d like to give it a try…

The BIPOC Bike Adventure Grant is Bikepacking Roots’ grant program created to help reduce the barriers to bike adventure for BIPOC individuals.  The BIPOC Bike Adventure Grant will support recipients by helping fund fun and empowering bike adventures.

Apply between now and November 8th. We anticipate requiring ~4-5 weeks to review and follow up with all applicants, meaning we plan on announcing the recipients and their planned adventures in mid-December.

Qualified applicants are those who
-have any level of experience riding a bicycle.
-would benefit from support in order to pursue a specific bike adventure.
-identify as BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color).
-live in the United States.
-are any gender identity, age, class, body size, or ability.

Proposals can include requests of $500 to $3,000+ for the autumn 2020 grant cycle. The next grant cycle will open in late spring of 2021. Some equipment support will also be available as needed.

Apply now at Bikepacking Roots!

Bike Mag: Solutions for Smaller Bikepackers – Magazine to Fold

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Bike Mag: Solutions for Smaller Bikepackers – Magazine to Fold

With the news today that Bike, Powder, Snowboarder, and Surfer Magazines have been shuttered by their owner, American Media, we can’t help but feel an immense loss in print magazines. This news was shocking, as Bike Mag’s content has always been sharp, including the last entry on their website, penned by Bikepacking Roots‘ Kurt Refsnider dubbed “Solutions for Smaller Bikepackers” which offers up a lot of pointers for cyclists who don’t ride a size large frame. Head on over to Bike Mag to read all about it.

Rivendell Bicycle Works Offers Black Reparations Pricing

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Rivendell Bicycle Works Offers Black Reparations Pricing

This just in from our friends at Rivendell

Starting October 12, Rivendell Bicycle Works, the 26-year-old San Francisco Bay Area bicycle company, is rolling out reparations pricing for Black customers.

Rivendell’s CEO, Grant Petersen says, “The American bicycle industry has been racist, often overtly racist, since 1878, and Rivendell has been obliviously—not “obviously”— racist ever since 1994. We say this not to scold the industry, not to scold other bicycle businesses, and not to be on-trend.

For the last two years, Rivendell Bicycle Works has offered a 45 percent discount to Black customers who shopped in person. COVID has curtailed that. They are going national with the same plan, but now with a name and an acronym: Black Reparations Pricing (BRP).

Ten percent of Rivendell’s bikes and frames will be allocated for BRP. In the 12-month period beginning October 2020, they’ll make about 850 bikes, 85 of which will be set aside for the discount program.

In its BRP plan, Rivendell adds, “Racism doesn’t respond to inaction or self-proclamation. In other words, it doesn’t go away when you know, even in your bones, that all people are created equal. It responds to anti-racist action. Reparations are an example. Not because Reparations are “a nice thing to do,” but because they’re owed.

Reparations acknowledge that, in this country, white wealth—recent or inherited/generational, has been ‘earned’ by the labor of Black people, who, even after slavery, were never given a leg up. Your non-Black tycoon great-grampa may have been born poor, may have been a sharp and clever go-getter at the top of his class, but he wasn’t born Black.”

Rivendell is also offering its customers the opportunity to contribute to the BRP fund with every purchase they make.

For further information about BRP, please follow this link:
https://www.rivbike.com/pages/black-reparations-pricing

To contact Rivendell regarding this story, please email john@rivbike.com

Bicycle Nomad and Blackburn Partner Up

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Bicycle Nomad and Blackburn Partner Up

Bicycle Nomad, that handsome cyclist from the California Golde project and beyond, has teamed up with Blackburn to become a brand ambassador. As someone who has played a small role in Blackburn’s bicycle touring lineup, this makes me excited. Erick Cedeño (Bicycle Nomad) is a beautiful human and I’m personally looking forward to seeing where this goes. I think Erick’s quote sums up the importance of this partnership:

“The cycling industry needs to have more representation in its marketing, so adults and, more importantly, children, can see themselves on a bike exploring their city, their country and their world,”

If you’re interested, the full press-release is below…

Adopt a Part of the Oregon Timber Trail

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Adopt a Part of the Oregon Timber Trail

Since 2017 the Oregon Timber Trail‘s ambitious stewardship initiative has been valued at over $80,000 annually and as a result, hundreds of miles of fallow trails have been reopened for access to all. Due to Covid-19, all of their stewardship events have been canceled, leaving hundreds of logs down, blocking the trail. If you’ve ever been riding and have come across downed trees, you know how much of a bummer that can be and that’s only the tip of the iceberg. Like a lot of trail organizations, most of the OTT’s humble budget is funded with government grants and many of these grants require a match in the form of volunteer labor. Which means their grant funding is in jeopardy as well.

Furthermore, it’s been a bad year for wildfires. The trail has been torched by at least six(!) separate fires in 2020, which will undoubtedly require extensive rehabilitation work in addition to the 3,000+ hours we’ve already committed to the Watson Fire Rehab project in 2021.

Not only do they have an $80,000 budget shortfall, but they also have a backlog of maintenance compounded by multiple actively-burning wildfires. The Oregon Timber Trail needs your help. The trail needs your help. If you’ve had the pleasure of riding any section of this trail, please consider donating something, anything, if you can and have the means. Consider it a usage fee ;-)

Donate now and ADOPT A TRAIL ➜

We’re Taking Labor Day Off

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We’re Taking Labor Day Off

It’s Labor Day in the States and today, we’re taking advantage of this national day of remembrance to hang with friends, disconnect from the online world, and get in some bike riding. I hope you’re able to do the same and we’ll see ya tomorrow, bright and early!

An Appreciation for Our (Cold Blooded) Trail Friends

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An Appreciation for Our (Cold Blooded) Trail Friends

Growing up, I had an obsession with all things cold-blooded. Perhaps it sprung from a childhood love for dinosaurs? Who knows. I had lots of reptile pets over the years, many of which are native species to the American West. Growing up on the East Coast, I couldn’t imagine what it would be like to see a Whiptail, Fence Lizard, Chuckwalla, Horned Lizard, or a Gila Monster in the wild. Our Eastern Blue Tailed Skinks, Broad Headed Skinks, and Anoles were the extend of our four-legged, local herpetofauna…

Adventure Audio Podcast

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Adventure Audio Podcast

John recently sat down with the team of the Adventure Audio Podcast to talk about the genesis of this very website. If you’ve got an hour to kill, it’s worth the listen for some background information on not only the intent of the Radavist but its place in the larger cycling industry.

Bikepacking Roots is Seeking New Members for Its Board of Directors

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Bikepacking Roots is Seeking New Members for Its Board of Directors

Bikepacking Roots is expanding and diversifying their Board of Directors and are welcoming applications from individuals looking to be a positive influence for and within the bikepacking community. The Board of Directors is made up of passionate volunteers who act as representatives of the organization and as advocates for the bikepacking community, the experiences we collectively seek, and the landscapes through which we ride. Read on below…

Renee Hutchens on the Land for RockShox

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Renee Hutchens on the Land for RockShox

Photo by Eric Arce

There’s been a lot of discussions on what “land” means here on this website and today our friend Renee Hutchens shared her thoughts at the RockShox website. The article is a great read and I encourage everyone to give it a read.

“Kinship, or K’é reflects a deep relationship with each other spanning generations upon generations. This is the seed of our resilience. The fact that I am here today speaks to this — it means my family, like every Indigenous family, did whatever they could to survive hundreds of years of violence, forced removal, forced assimilation, genocide, destruction of our cultures, identities, our land, and natural resources. Despite all of this they ensured my existence today. But the violence of colonial thinking never ended. We live in a country that continues to render us invisible. Indigenous erasure is our modern form of racism that continues to inflict trauma on top of historical trauma. Therefore, I’m drawn to go to a place where I am seen and heard, where I can heal, re(connect) with my identity, culture, and traditions.

This place is on the land.”

Read this exceptional piece at RockShox