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Make Your Next Road Trip Easier with Dometic’s Electronic Coolers and Battery Pack

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Make Your Next Road Trip Easier with Dometic’s Electronic Coolers and Battery Pack

While this is a cycling website, we like to give nods to products that make our lives easier while on the road. With the booming popularity of car camping and cycling road trips, come a lot of decision making about what products work best for extended or even weekend getaways. One such product that has been thoroughly vetted over the years over here are Dometic’s electric coolers. We’ve been using the CFX series for a few years now and these coolers have a big leg up on the competition in that they have the ability to run autonomously from your vehicle’s electric systems thanks to the PLB40 battery. Take a look below for more information and a promotional code for free shipping to readers of the Radavist.

Hard to the Core: The Kona ESD is a Misfit Hardtail

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Hard to the Core: The Kona ESD is a Misfit Hardtail

There seems to exist a set of truisms in mountain biking: your next bike will always be better than your last, my local trails are harder than your local trails, and the fastest local rider isn’t on Strava and humbly rides a singlespeed. Then there’s the local legend, a misfit rider, the slightly anachronistic character that emerges on the trail mid-group-ride on a hardcore hardtail who rides loose and fast and with reckless disregard.

When Kona announced the Honzo ESD earlier this year it came as a great surprise. The original Honzo has remained relatively unchanged since 2012 and this new version looked like a poolhall brawler by comparison. Dominated by modern geometry, BMX inspired frame lines, and a build kit suitable for Bender himself, it was clear this was going to be no ordinary Honzo…

Bike-Camping Along Michigan’s North Country Trail on the Bombtrack Beyond+ ADV

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Bike-Camping Along Michigan’s North Country Trail on the Bombtrack Beyond+ ADV

The North Country Trail

Way back in the mid-80’s I was born about 30 minutes outside of Detroit, Michigan. The area I was in did not exactly lend itself to cycling becoming a hobby at the time, so I really never became interested in bikes and the outdoors until I moved to California and found the mountains as an adult. Fast forward to 2020 when my plans to ride through far-flung mountains in Asia all summer came grinding to a halt along with everyone else’s lives, I found myself back in Michigan for an unknown period of time.

A Good Run with the Goodyear 29 x 2.6 Escape MTB Tires

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A Good Run with the Goodyear 29 x 2.6 Escape MTB Tires

“Are those GOODYEAR MTB tires?!” Since first building up my Starling Murmur, I have received more questions on its tires than the bike itself. On my preferred terrain, tires don’t last long, sometimes I’ll get a month out of them, sometimes it only takes a single ride for me to have a few Dynaplugs in them, so when tires last nine months, I am beyond impressed. I’ve had great luck and a good run with the Goodyear 29 x 2.6″ Escape tires, so let’s take a quick look at these robust tires…

Condensare Pack List: Bailey’s Moné Hardtail 29er Loaded Up for Touring the Northern New Mexico CDT

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Condensare Pack List: Bailey’s Moné Hardtail 29er Loaded Up for Touring the Northern New Mexico CDT

Tomorrow, we’ll be sharing our Reportage from our tour of the CDT in Northern New Mexico but today I wanted to give Bailey a showcase on his Moné and how he packs for a three-day trip…

The poet Basil Bunting, while poring over an antiquated German-Italian dictionary, found the German verb dichten (to write poetry) translated as condensare (to condense/shorten). This became one of the guiding principles of Modernist poetry;  which would state; “Great literature is simply language charged with meaning to the utmost degree.” In my early 20s, I fancied myself a student of Modernist writing and, unsurprisingly, many of its ideologies found a place in my daily life. This concept in particular is one that has remained important to me and thus, my approach to touring/bike packing. If one can distill their gear down to items that have the utmost meaning or necessity, while doing away with any superfluities, the result is a light and nimble bike, allowing the rider maximum enjoyment of the terrain to be traversed without compromising their safety and comfort along the way.

Integrated, Easy, and Made in the USA: Wolf Tooth’s CAMO BashSpider and Ring

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Integrated, Easy, and Made in the USA: Wolf Tooth’s CAMO BashSpider and Ring

Modern mountain bikes have low bottom brackets. There are many reasons for the push for lower bottom brackets but like each technological or geometric advancement, there is always an effect. One of which is you’re very likely to smash your chainring on rocks with a low bottom bracket and while there is a multitude of bash guards out there, I’ve recently tried out the Wolf Tooth CAMO BashSpider and chainring. Read on below for a quick review of this system on my Starling Murmur with Cane Creek eeWings cranks…

This Just In: PEARL iZUMi X-Alp Launch SPD MTB Shoes

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This Just In: PEARL iZUMi X-Alp Launch SPD MTB Shoes

I must say, the latest footwear drop from PEARL iZUMi really grabbed my attention. Over the years, the brand has made a big push to constantly update and redesign their classic silhouettes and one shoe that recently got a facelift is their X-Alp Launch SPD shoes. Now with a BOA closure system and this beautiful kiyote tan color, I had to try a pair out. After a few rides on our local MTB trails, I think I got the gist and can talk a bit about them, so read on below for a quick and succinct “This Just In” review…

Four Months of Riding Shimano’s 12-Speed Deore M6100: “the People’s Champ”

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Four Months of Riding Shimano’s 12-Speed Deore M6100: “the People’s Champ”

The constant evolution of mountain bike technology over the past few years has been relentless. Mixed in with the breakneck progression comes fierce competition between the two powerhouses of component manufacturing; SRAM and Shimano. While Shimano was arguably a bit late to the 1x game when compared to SRAM’s early adoption of this technology, over the past few years they’ve proven they’re taking it seriously and have completely revamped one of their most beloved groups, Deore with trickle-down tech normally only found on the higher-priced tiers. I’ve been riding the entire M6100 kit for the past four months here in Santa Fe on my Mystic hardtail and I’m ready to talk about it, so let’s drop right in…

Shoulder Season Riding with the Light and Motion VIS 360 PRO

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Shoulder Season Riding with the Light and Motion VIS 360 PRO

Whether you like it or not, shorter days are on the horizon and that means your after-work rides will be most likely happening in the dark. We’ve already been putting in miles once the sun dips behind the Jemez mountains here in Santa Fe and I’ve finally figured out what my winter riding kit will be. After Light and Motion worked on the video profile of the Radavist last year, I got a bag of lights to try out. My favorite in the bunch is the lightweight VIS 360 PRO. When mounted on a helmet like so, it’s a great supplemental spotlight to help guide your way on even the darkest trails. Check out a quick review of this system below.

An In-Depth Look at Ortlieb’s 2021 Waterproof Bikepacking Lineup

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An In-Depth Look at Ortlieb’s 2021 Waterproof Bikepacking Lineup

Bikepacking gear has evolved so much over the last couple of years and I’m always excited to see brands expand on products and concepts that are proven to work and also step up to create solutions to carrying gear on bikes in innovative ways. Utilizing 100% the waterproof and durable construction they are known for, Ortlieb just released updates to their classic bikepacking line and also added some interesting new products. In advance of the products becoming available this week, Ortleib sent me a handful of bags from their new and revamped bikepacking lineup. I’ve been using them on my Kona Sutra, fairly full and weighted, around my local singletrack to provide some initial insights and detailed photos of some of the new aspects.

SRAM’s Eagle GX Offers 52t at an Affordable Price but Is It Worth It?

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SRAM’s Eagle GX Offers 52t at an Affordable Price but Is It Worth It?

We often joke that Eagle GX killed the singlespeed MTB and by “we” I mean myself and Bailey Newbrey, someone who knows a lot about SSMTB riding and racing. Using Bailey in this opening sentence is relevant for a number of reasons and yes, it also legitimizes that statement in many ways. While this won’t be a history lesson in SSMTB riding, it does mull over the antithesis of that, SRAM’s Eagle GX drivetrain.

I’ve been riding the new Eagle GX with its massive 52t cassette for a few months now and have finally flogged it enough to be able to write an honest review of this system, so read on below.

More than a Throwback: the Yeti ARC 29er Hardtail

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More than a Throwback: the Yeti ARC 29er Hardtail

We’re big into hardtails here at the Radavist. While my personal bikes are all steel, riding carbon bikes can be a real treat, especially when the company has put so much thought into the design.

Yeti has a long history of designing capable and attractive bikes. The original ARC was a collaboration with Easton and the intent was to make a truly lightweight machine in that era. The OG ARC’s aluminum frameset weighed a mere 3.2lbs, which was a groundbreaking accomplishment for 1991 and those bikes are still iconic, even today.

You could say Yeti had a lot riding on this new ARC design and there were a few decisions that set this new model on a different trajectory from its predecessor. After riding this bike for a month here in Santa Fe, I’ve finally wrapped my head around how to review it, pointing out its accomplishments and my own personal critiques of this entirely new model, so read on for more…

A Perfect Fit: the Revelate Hopper Frame Bag on John’s Starling Cycles Murmur 29er

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A Perfect Fit: the Revelate Hopper Frame Bag on John’s Starling Cycles Murmur 29er

Full suspension bikes can be used for bikepacking. It just takes a little problem-solving in terms of bag design, fitment, and capacity. Yet, that’s not what we’re discussing here. Modern mountain bikes seem to be designed for shuttle runs in perfectly-groomed bike parts, not all-day rides on backcountry trials. Most new bike models fit a bottle and by “a bottle” I mean a small bottle. I ride XL-sized frames and every time I throw my leg over one, I’m baffled at the lack of bottle carrying capacity. This is a gripe for another day, however, because I recently found a way to solve this problem on my Starling Murmur 29er and it was easier than you’d think.

The Revelate Hopper Frame Bag is an off-the-shelf option that fits like a custom solution. Let’s check it out below. Yes, I’m excited about this one!

An In-Depth Review of the Redesigned Swift Zeitgeist Saddle/Handlebar Pack

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An In-Depth Review of the Redesigned Swift Zeitgeist Saddle/Handlebar Pack

Years ago, after finishing the slowest-known-time attempt on the Oregon Outback during its 2nd annual ride, I wound up in Seattle.  Just to clarify for those familiar with our rolling squad of rodeo clowns from that year, we didn’t shit in that dudes yard, we were drunk in the woods 40 miles behind because we couldn’t even make it to most peoples 1st night camp on our 2nd day.

Lael Rides Alaska: Touring the Dalton Highway and Gear Breakdown

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Lael Rides Alaska: Touring the Dalton Highway and Gear Breakdown

Dalton Highway

We land in Deadhorse on the North Slope of Alaska in the evening under sunny skies and drag our cardboard bike boxes out of the single gate terminal. We’re the only passengers on the flight not starting a two-week work shift on the oil fields. The wind is ripping so fast, it’s hard to put the bikes together. We help each other. We velcro bags to our bikes and load up our camping gear. It’s cold enough that we put on all of our clothing layers. We cram days’ worth of food into every pack. The workers at the airport are kind and helpful. A woman gives us directions to the shop where we can buy a camping stove canister and a can of bear spray that we couldn’t bring on the plane. She asks us to leave our bike boxes in storage. They always save the big ones for hunters.

Rippin’ Ass in Ripton & Co’s Action Jorts: A Review

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Rippin’ Ass in Ripton & Co’s Action Jorts: A Review

I’m not going to lie, when I first saw the post about Ripton & Co I thought it was a joke, and if it wasn’t a joke why have I missed the business opportunity of the decade sitting right in front of my face. At a startling $89 for a pair boutique cut off jorts, I was stunned. I was shortly connected to the Jort Lord, Elliot Wilkinson-Ray, who asked what size I wanted and if I wanted the shorts hemmed or cut off, I chose to go with cut off to go for the full jort experience.

A Review of the Wahoo Roam and a Reluctant Luddite

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A Review of the Wahoo Roam and a Reluctant Luddite

To start, my Review of the Wahoo Roam is definitely going to be a bit narrow in scope, I don’t often ride road bikes, have a bunch of random sensors all over my body and bike, or keep meticulous logs of all my riding, so about 50% of the cool shit this device can do goes untouched by me.  You’re probably asking, what the hell do you ride and why are you talking to me about this? Well, I like to do short mountain bike rides and longer touring routes, both of which are super rad to have a GPS device for.  I also dabble in route creation, Im no Sarah Swallow, but I’ve been dipping my toes in the water and having a Wahoo has made that a more fruitful experience.