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Finding Myself

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Finding Myself

I got my first bike in 2010 and a few years later I was moving around four different cities, racing alleycats, road, cyclocross, MTB. I rode ultra distances along Route 66 and Translabrador Highway – the bike took me so many places, yet I began to realize I was looking for something I couldn’t find.

The Radavist 2021 Calendar: January

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The Radavist 2021 Calendar: January

This is the first layout of the Radavist 2021 Calendar, entitled “Snow Way, Santa Fe” shot with a Sony A9ii and a Tamron 28-200mm f/2.8-5.6 di iii rxd lens in the Santa Fe National Forest, NM.

“Living in a mountain town means when the snow hits, the ski hill is packed but the trails will be wide open for fun…”

For a high-res JPG, suitable for print and desktop wallpaper*, right-click and save link as – The Radavist 2021 – January. Please, this photo is for personal use only!
(*set background to white and center for optimal coverage)

The mobile background this month is from a Chihuahuan Desert canyon road Click here to download January’s Mobile Wallpaper.

Lael Rides Alaska 2021 Femme-Trans-Women’s Scholarship

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Lael Rides Alaska 2021 Femme-Trans-Women’s Scholarship

In the summer of 2017, Lael Wilcox rode all of the major roads in Alaska, totaling 4,500 miles on mixed pavement and gravel. Lael is fourth-generation Alaskan. This is where she began endurance riding and her goal to get to know her home state.

In 2020, Lael went back to Alaska with her girlfriend Rue, a photojournalist, to ride together and document her project of riding all of the roads.

This scholarship is intended to enable another woman to design and ride her own 1,000 mile Alaskan adventure in the summer of 2021. This scholarship is open to a woman (including femme, trans and non-binary) of any age with any level of bicycle touring experience. We are looking for positive energy and a strong desire to experience the remote roads of Alaska and have some fun.

The recipient of the scholarship will receive a Specialized Diverge bicycle, Revelate Designs bikepacking bags, PEARL iZUMi apparel, a premium subscription to Komoot, Easton wheels, a Wahoo ELEMNT ROAM GPS, Big Agnes camping equipment, Rene Herse tires, a year subscription to Bicycle Quarterly, Trail Butter, and a $1,500 travel stipend provided by Easton.

Prepare a digital application based upon the questions on the following page and send to Lael Wilcox and the selection team at laelridesalaska@gmail.com no later than February 6, 2021. Provide your responses as the text of an email. The recipient of the scholarship will be announced April 5, 2021.

The scholarship selection team includes Lael Wilcox, previous scholarship recipients Kailey Kornhauser and Brooke Larsen, Abigale Wilson from PEARL iZUMi, Cari Carmean from The Radavist, and Natsuko Hirose from Bicycle Quarterly.

Head to LaelWilcox.com to apply for this scholarship!

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Lael Rides Alaska

After we featured various Lael Rides Alaska stories last year, PEARL iZUMi has sponsored this wonderful video project by Rue!

Lael Wilcox is a 4th generation Alaskan and an ultra-distance cyclist. In 2014, she began pushing her limits in her home state and dreamed that one day, she’d ride all of the major roads in Alaska– connecting the dots and traveling under her own steam to places she’d heard of but never seen. In 2017, after her first year running Anchorage GRIT, Lael spent the summer riding all of the roads, some 4,500 miles. She had the time of her life but rode mostly solo, and that experience was all her own. In reflection, she wanted to share more–to show people the beauty and truth of Alaska and inspire more people to ride there. The global pandemic of 2020 provided a unique opportunity to revisit this project–ride from home, spend time with her family, bring them along, and encourage others to pursue their own adventures.

Riding roads is feeling topography and weather, seeing history and reality, and experiencing everything along the way. If the finish line is home, how much farther can we go? If we bring along our loved ones, how much more will it mean?

This project is in support of the Anchorage GRIT project and the “Lael Ride Alaska Women’s Scholarship Program.”

The Radavist’s Top Articles of 2020

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The Radavist’s Top Articles of 2020

Coming off a week of downtime after one of the most tumultuous years of our lives has brought clarity to this annual retrospective. To be honest, I had no idea what to expect as Covid-19 gripped the global community and changed life as we know it. We looked to our new home in Santa Fe, New Mexico and the surrounding areas for inspiration, pinged our good friends for their penmanship, and listened to communities that have been underrepresented in cycling. What resulted were a lot of articles that tackled some big issues and the realization that we still have a lot of work to do.

I’ve spent the past few weeks mulling over our content and have compiled a list of some of the most meaningful and fun pieces from the past twelve months.  Read on below for a selection of memorable moments from 2020, in chronological order…

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Kialani Hines: Validation

Kialani Hines knows while there is always space for a shreddy edit, focusing on her riding, she decided to take “Validation” in another direction:

“My goal with the short video is to share something I’ve been passionate about, help welcome all to something that has created a safe space for me, and to encourage new faces to fall in love with what makes them happy (hopefully that is mountain biking!). It’s been an incredible experience and privilege creating my vision with Heather Young and Grow Cycling Foundation. I hope that it inspires all to follow whatever path they envision for themselves.”

Super Jambo Grom Pre 200

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Super Jambo Grom Pre 200

Shit on it, vomit on it, give birth to it… that’s what it’s like organising the Super Jambo Grom Pre 200. An informal 200km gravel event on Ngarigo land, Yaouk Valley, in my home country, Australia. An event that centres all the things we have learnt this year – but also to get loose and have some well-earned fun!

Announcing the Western Wildlands Route: A New Name for the Wild West Route

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Announcing the Western Wildlands Route: A New Name for the Wild West Route

The Western Wildlands Route as seen from the Paria Plateau in northern Arizona, traditional homelands of the Ute, Southern Paiute, Pueblo, Hopi, and Diné Tribes.

At Bikepacking Roots, our mission includes “advocating for the landscapes through which we ride.” Indigenous peoples are an integral part of the future, present, and past landscapes in U.S. America. Thus, as advocates for a healthy, vibrant, and whole Western landscape, we are responsible for communicating and educating ourselves, our members, and the riders of the routes we design in a way that progresses Indigenous liberation from colonial trauma. With that intent, we’re announcing the renaming of the 2,700-mile-long Wild West Route to the Western Wildlands Route.

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1 OF 1 : Spectrum Paint & Powder Works – Artisan Craftsfolk

If you’ve seen a Beautiful Bicycle here on the Radavist with a crazy paint or powder coat from Mosaic or other brands, there’s a good chance it came from this shop, Spectrum Paint & Powder Works:

“Typically this time of year, many in the bike industry are (would be thanks to the pandemic) be priming for the Chris King Open House in Portland, Oregon. It’s an event that highlights amazing unique bike builds from a small selected group in the bike industry. One of those chosen for this year is Arthaya Nootecharas of Spectrum Paint and Powder Works. She also works for the sister company Mosaic Cycles.

Spectrum Paint and Powder Works isn’t shy about what they do our how they do it while being welcoming of any rider looking to have a bike that others will drool over. Especially this masterpiece for the Open House that was to be.

Arthaya’s concept reflects her art outside of spraying frames or designing the next dream build, incorporating her style of drawings and sketches of the world. The bike is full of simple yet organic lines, laden with little details. “It’s not chaos. It’s just a lot of lines, but it’s organized,” she says. Come along and learn more about Arthaya’s craftwork and passion for cycling art.”

Nice one, PEARL iZUMi!

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Ruta Chingaza: Bikepacking for Conservation

In February, legendary ultra-endurance cyclist Lael Wilcox, Joe Cruz, and the filmmaker Rugile Kaladyte traveled to the Colombian capital of Bogota, in partnership with Conservation International, Wahoo, and Bikepacking.com, to launch the Bikepacking for Conservation Program. The project was designed to explore and scout a bikepacking route that would connect the bustling metropolis of Bogota with rural communities and the Chingaza National Park. The resulting route — Ruta Chingaza — will help cyclists connect to nature and better understand the ecosystems upon which life and livelihoods in this area depend.

Chingaza National Natural Park is currently closed to cyclists, but Conservation International is collaborating with park authorities to make cycling a part of the park’s tourism strategy, and anticipate that cycling experiences (including bikepacking) will be permitted by sometime in 2021, though it is hard to anticipate when exactly due to COVID-19. Please do not travel to the park at this time

Film shot and edited by Rugile Kaladyte

Cyclista Zine Instagram Live with Renee Hutchens for Indigenous Peoples Day

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Cyclista Zine Instagram Live with Renee Hutchens for Indigenous Peoples Day

Today at 4pm CT, Cyclista Zine is holding a discussion on Instagram Live with Renee Hutchens to commemorate Indigenous Peoples Day. Here’s what they will be discussing and if you’re interested, you should check it out:

“It’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Today is about more than just honoring and respecting Indigenous people, which we should do every day. Today we explicitly question and counter the story that conquering land gives you a right to it, that Native people only exist in the past, and that the future is inevitably a colonial one. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Outdoorspeople have long been avid tellers of this story. We love to use colonial and Columbian metaphors to describe what we do. Adventure. Discover. Conquer. Explore. #NeverStopExploring, right? ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
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Today, and every day, let’s unequivocally reject this celebration of Columbus and the 528 years of violent exploration and adventure he represents. When we hike, when we climb, when we paddle, when we cycle, when we take and post pictures, whether in National Parks or in urban spaces, we must #StopExploring and acknowledge the land’s original stewards. Language is part of the struggle, part of defining who we are and what we do, so let’s be intentional. Stop exploring and learn to fight for an indigenous future. #publiclandisnativeland⠀⠀

Follow Cyclista Zine.⠀⠀⠀

Lael Rides Alaska: Alaskan Island Time

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Lael Rides Alaska: Alaskan Island Time

We continue our Lael Rides Alaska series with a beautiful story from a series of rides on some of Alaska’s islands. Check out more from this series in the ‘Related’ column below when you’re done reading this entry. Enjoy!

Staring at maps in 2017 on my mission to ride all of the major roads in Alaska, I was drawn in by a few remote destinations with more extensive road networks, specifically Nome, Kodiak Island, and Prince of Wales Island. In that summer, I made it to Nome and rode the three roads out of town— to the native village of Teller, to the river that leads to the historic gold mining town of Council, and to the active mining road that ends at the Kougarok River for a total of 230 miles.