#commuter-bike

tag

A Look at the New Agave Products Handlebar Bag: the Arroyo Backpack

Reportage

A Look at the New Agave Products Handlebar Bag: the Arroyo Backpack

One of the joys this website has brought me over the years is helping out small companies jettison their products into the world. From component manufacturers, apparel brands, frame builders, and yes, bag makers, there’s something special about watching a brand bloom over time and having been a part of that process. Last week, I met this fella named Jeff at Sincere Cycles where he showed me a new prototype bag he’s developing under the moniker Agave Products called the Arroyo Backpack.

Jeff and Agave are based in Austin, Texas, my old stomping grounds, and so this project plucked at my heartstrings a bit. Read on for a more in-depth look at the Arroyo Backpack…

This New Yorker Cover by R. Kikuo Johnson Really Normalizes Bikes!

Radar

This New Yorker Cover by R. Kikuo Johnson Really Normalizes Bikes!

What a pleasure it is to see cycling on the cover of a magazine on the New Yorker. For this forthcoming October 26th issue, artist R. Kikuo Johnson normalizes cycling as a form of legitimate transportation, even with a child in tow. While it does create a bit of visual conflict with public transit, not automobiles, we can look past that as an unintended byproduct of the artist’s vision. Hopefully, there will be more pro-cycling and transportation advocacy articles within the pages of the New Yorker. Check out the full cover below…

Radar

Choose Cycling

Choose Cycling looks at two UK-based cyclists, Ore and Lucy, and spotlights what drew them to bikes and commuting.

Readers’ Rides: RJ Rabe’s Sequoia Basket Bike Build

Reportage

Readers’ Rides: RJ Rabe’s Sequoia Basket Bike Build

For this week’s Readers’ Rides, our friend RJ Rabe shares his vintage Sequoia townie build in a high res gallery…

I don’t know much about this particular Sequoia before it came into my life. Beyond that, it lived in the rafters of my friend Austin Horse’s New York apartment before I brought it back to California some years ago. You can see the sticker from the shop that originally sold it on the seat tube, with the protective film somewhat intact.

A Different Kind of Maker: Jacob from Bread Shop Santa Fe and his Surly Cross Check

Reportage

A Different Kind of Maker: Jacob from Bread Shop Santa Fe and his Surly Cross Check

We visit a lot of makers here at the Radavist. From frames to components to bags. 2020 has put a lot of that on momentary pause, yet I’ve enjoyed meeting cyclists serendipitously since moving to Santa Fe, many of which are small business owners. One of those is Jacob from Bread Shop. He and his wife Mayme, along with his brother Zac run a small bakery that’s big on taste. We’ve been buying loaves once a week from Bread Shop and this week I met up with Jacob to shoot his Surly Cross-Check.

Just Put It In the Basket: Spencer’s Crust Clydesdale Fork-Equipped Fuji Sundance

Reportage

Just Put It In the Basket: Spencer’s Crust Clydesdale Fork-Equipped Fuji Sundance

Ya ever wondered if you could keep only one of your bikes, which would it be?  At this point in my life I’d have to say my Fuji Sundance with a Crust Bikes Clydesdale fork up front.  This is my “daily driver” that serves for commuting, errand running, Costco runs, carrying coworkers home, or just taking the dog out for a spin. Vintage 26” rigid bikes are the bikes that just wont die and continue to show themselves as being so damn useful, and nothing compliments that better than the Clydesdale fork.

The Readers Write: the New York Pizza and Dynamo Society

Radar

The Readers Write: the New York Pizza and Dynamo Society

The Readers Write is a short-form feature where readers can write about their local rides, submit photos, and course routes, lowering the barrier for entry with sharing stories here on the Radavist. It’s a new feature we’re implementing in 2020 but have yet to set up the infrastructure for submissions, so sit tight!

Convincing folks to do a group ride is difficult enough during daylight hours in nice weather conditions, but as the nights grow longer and colder, finding a crew to roll with becomes damn near impossible. Enter the New York Pizza and Dynamo Society (NYPDS): A group of cyclists dedicated to exploring some of our city’s finest eateries, exclusively by the light of kinetically-driven lamps.

Alex and His Miyata City Bike

Reportage

Alex and His Miyata City Bike

At first glance, you might see this bike and think “sheesh, another $8,000 commuter bike made by someone in Portland.” Rightfully so! This is a clean bike but Alex spent $500 on this Miyata before adding some crucial details to keep him rolling safe and comfortable on the streets of Los Angeles, to and from work…

Readers’ Rides: Justin’s Moots Psychlo-X

Radar

Readers’ Rides: Justin’s Moots Psychlo-X

A few years back, we would post the bikes from the readers of this site, in a feature dubbed Readers’ Rides. Well, we’ve been getting a bunch of inquiries over the years as to if or when we’re bringing these posts back and the answer is yes! They will be cut and dry, down and dirty, cell phone style photos. As you can imagine, this will open the torrent of submissions, so hold tight until I can set up a new email address for this next week.

After yesterday’s OysterBar post, the designer of the bar shared his Moots and a little back story. I thought it was a perfect seque into relaunching this fun feature…

Sam’s Black Sheep Lifetime Bike

Reportage

Sam’s Black Sheep Lifetime Bike

Titanium bikes. They’re often referred to as “lifetime bikes” due to the metal’s oxide barrier, inhibiting it from rusting in the traditional sense of the word. A Ti bike will last for a lifetime with its only limiting factor being the technology of the components and the riders ability to adapt the bike as their tastes in life change. So yes, in essence, a titanium bike can be a lifetime bike, but how often are they really? Well, working at Summit Bike and Ski in Bozeman, I found a true to form “lifetime bike.”

Curtis Inglis’ 2010 Oregon Manifest Retrotec City Bike

Reportage

Curtis Inglis’ 2010 Oregon Manifest Retrotec City Bike

Way back in 2010, an event called the Oregon Manifest pinged a selection of frame builders to solve common usage problems with bikes. This included cargo carrying specifications ranging from the large and out of the ordinary, to the simple task of carrying a change of clothes. It just so happened that in 2010, the Oregon Manifest’s task was to carry just that. For Retrotec and Inglis Cycles‘ Curtis Inglis, he approached this challenge by first looking for inspiration within his own shop.

Curtis had this Salsa quill stem, back when they were made in California in the shop of Ross Shafer, whos shop, and employees, like Sean Walling influenced Curtis’ own frame building operations. We’ll look at that more in-depth tomorrow. For now, let’s focus on this bike. So there he was, with this stem that needed a home. He had an idea of what the frame was supposed to look like and pinged his buddy Jeff Hantman to make some half wheel fenders with the Retrotec “guy,” smiling on the back and a halftone fade.

As for the frame, well, that’s the easy part for Curtis. He got to work, knowing the design challenges of the frame including the need to carry a spare change of clothes for the party after the show, perhaps harkening to the need for commuters to have nice “work” clothing once they’ve rolled into their office job. Curtis brought white loafers, a pair of plaid pants that he converted into nickers. He then had Travis at Freight Baggage to include the scraps of plaid into the rack bag still being used on the bike today. Curtis even painted the Pass and Stow rack to match! Chuey even made a cycling cap of this material. Bottom line: Curtis thought out all the details for this bike, including many of his friend’s work in his final product.

This bike has a new use now; Curtis carries their dog Coco around town with his wife on their city cruises. I wish I could have gotten a photo of that during my stay, but Curtis had his hands full with unexpected life events.

____

Follow Retrotec on Instagram.

No Compromises: A Firefly Super Commuter

Radar

No Compromises: A Firefly Super Commuter

For some people, commuting by bicycle to work each day is the only time they’re assured time on the bike, so making those rides as enjoyable as possible is an added bonus. When it comes to Firefly, I can’t think of a better ride experience, so starting your day on something like this must be an extra special treat. Check out more at the Firefly Tumblr.