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Mosaic Drops the Mic with the New 29×2.25 GT-X Gravel and Adventure Bikes

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Mosaic Drops the Mic with the New 29×2.25 GT-X Gravel and Adventure Bikes

Mosaic has added two new frameset models to their G-Series lineup of gravel and adventure bikes. The GT-1X and GT-2X are two new Mosaic framesets for riders seeking a big tire, off-road capable titanium adventure bike. Both GT-X frames are designed around a 29×2.25 tire, a gravel-specific or MTB drivetrain, and a geometry that incorporates a longer top tube and shorter stem, allowing the rider to set up their GT-X in a drop bar or flat bar configuration. The addition of optional frame bag and accessory mounts, as well as rack and fender mounts, make the GT-X capable of all-season, all-terrain exploration.

The GT-1X utilizes Mosaic’s top-of-the-line, double-butted titanium tubeset. Custom geometry and a rider-specific tubeset are included as “standard” options on GT-1X, making it a truly custom build. The GT-1X is offered in the rider’s choice of Mosaic Paint Layout or the Mosaic Factory Finish.

The GT-2X utilizes Mosaic’s simpler straight gauge titanium tubeset. The GT-2X is offered in 7 stock sizes from S-XXL, with custom geometry available as an upgrade. The GT-2X is finished in Mosaic’s standard raw finish, with available upgrade options to a Mosaic Paint Layout or the Mosaic Factory Finish.

Every GT-X adventure bike is built to order and finished in Mosaic’s Boulder, Colorado facility. Orders can be placed through a Mosaic dealer, and frames carry a 12 week lead time from the date that the details are confirmed, the order is signed off and put into the build queue.

See more at Mosaic.

File Till You Die: Frame Builder Eli “De Bicla” Acosta From Básica Studio in Mexico City

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File Till You Die: Frame Builder Eli “De Bicla” Acosta From Básica Studio in Mexico City

My partner Karla and I find ourselves in México City after what feels like going in and out of a pipe from Mario’s world. The truth is we took a plane, but after so much time of having this trip in mind, it takes a while to assimilate that it’s actually happening. We spend an afternoon putting our bikes together and some bolts later they’re ready to take us around this city; we feel quite intimidated by its size and the never-not-honking cars but the bike paths that have emerged over the recent years make riding much more manageable. Coming from a place that’s pretty much at sea level, the 2200 meters of elevation squeeze our lungs on the slightest uphill and when we arrive at the address on our map our hearts are beating fast. There’s no sign outside the place but a rack full of bikes indicates we’ve made it to Básica Studio, home of frame builder Eli Acosta.

Speedvagen: Titanium Ichico Blast and Ingrid Rugged Road Package

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Speedvagen: Titanium Ichico Blast and Ingrid Rugged Road Package

If there is one thing this year has taught us, it is that we need to embrace the alternative now more than ever. With a parts shortage and global pandemic, this year has tossed all it had at us. Instead of going silent and resting on what we have built, we decided to push harder and be more creative than ever, launching a bike every single month, despite these challenges. This led us to full year of trying new parts, new finishes, and having more fun, which is what this is supposed to be all about right?…

Work for No22 Bicycles!

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Work for No22 Bicycles!

No. 22 is looking for a finishing and fabrication specialist to join our small and growing team of framebuilders in our Johnstown, NY production facility. A great candidate will be passionate about craftsmanship at the highest level and will have previous bicycle manufacturing experience.

The role can be tailored to suit the right candidate, but at its core would involve masking, painting, anodizing, and other finishing-related tasks, as well as ancillary tasks such as packing, shipping, workstation cleaning, and inventory control. Opportunities in fabrication, machining, assembly, and other facets of the framebuilding process can be added to the role for the right candidate.

An ideal applicant will have demonstrated experience with crafting boutique or custom bicycles, outstanding attention to detail, and above all a pride in building bikes to the highest possible standards. The following skills will be helpful in the role:

-Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work with a collaborative team
-Strong attention to detail
-Previous experience with the manufacturing or finishing of bicycles and components, including masking, bead blasting, polishing, anodizing or painting
-Experience with titanium framebuilding a definite asset
-Comfortable safely working with hand tools and light manufacturing equipment
-Interest in developing own skills and knowledge
-Familiarity with graphic design programs and particularly Adobe Illustrator is an asset
-Bicycle knowledge and mechanical experience is helpful but not required

Please send your resume and cover letter to info@22bicycles.com

The New Readymade Speedvagen Urban Racer Comes in Three Build Specs

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The New Readymade Speedvagen Urban Racer Comes in Three Build Specs

This year Speedvagen is doing something a little different with their Urban Racer coaster brake bike. For one, the coaster brake has been upgraded to a Moné Bad Ass Coaster Wheel. Then it also got three different build kits: a drop bar with big ass tires (pictured here – $4150), the same build kit but with moto riser bars ($4395), and then the original Urban Racer with slicks and a fillet brazed bar/stem ($4500). Of course these bikes feature all the Speedvagen accouterment, including the Berserker dropouts, chain guard, and more. The biggest aesthetic change this year, however, has got to be the matching cerakote paint and components.

These new Urban Racers are built in batches of 11, awaiting orders to be sent off to their new home. Head on over to Speedvagen to see more.

Can I just say “wow” one more time?

 

Dillen From Baphomet Bicycles’ “Left Hand Path” Singlespeed 29er

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Dillen From Baphomet Bicycles’ “Left Hand Path” Singlespeed 29er

We took a look at Baphomet Bicycles earlier this year and in that post, we discussed the ideology surrounding the iconography of this unique framebuilding operation, nestled in the mountain town of Taos, New Mexico. If you haven’t read that piece, you really should check it out first.

Yesterday I caught up with Dillen from Baphomet Bicycles, as he came to town to ride the BFL, an event Sincere Cycles throws each year, offering a classic 55 mile loop with over 10,000′ elevation gain and a “B” loop with 38 miles and 6,400′ elevation. Both take you deep into the Sangre de Cristo mountains at the terminus of the mighty Rocky Mountains. Doing either singlespeed is quite the undertaking!

Dillen finished this build right before the event and drove in from Taos for the day. We pedaled together briefly and then his chain exploded about 10 miles into the ride, sending him back down to town. Later in the day, we caught up to shoot his new 29er hardtail, aptly named the “Left Hand Path”, so let’s check it out in detail below!

Is This Firefly #1066 The Dreamiest Yet?

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Is This Firefly #1066 The Dreamiest Yet?

We’ve shared, photographed, and yeah, owned some pretty amazing Firefly builds over the years but this one, #1066, might take the cake in terms of a deep custom creation. There are so many hidden details, from the 44RN ring, to the ano-matched eeWings cranks, anodized stem, and more. Spend some time drooling over a few more choice details below and see the full spread at Firefly’s Flickr.

From the Pro’s Closet: Mark Slate’s 1983 WTB Steve Potts-Built ‘Banana Slug’

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From the Pro’s Closet: Mark Slate’s 1983 WTB Steve Potts-Built ‘Banana Slug’

Many of you are obviously familiar with the brand WTB, or Wilderness Trail Bikes. They make awesome tires, saddles, wheels, and other accessories but for a long time in the decade following the birth of mountain biking, they made all sorts of bicycle components including headsets, handlebars, bottom brackets, frames, and more. We reached out to Mark Slate, one of the founders of WTB for his thoughts on one of the most iconic bikes to leave the WTB and Steve Potts workshops: the Banana Slug, Steve Potts #45. I documented this wonderful dream bike – don’t you want one? – during a recent visit to the Pro’s Closet and am honored to have Mark’s thoughts on it here at the Radavist. Read on for Mark’s words and Steve’s handiwork below!

From the Pro’s Closet: 1989 Otis Guy from the ‘Art of the Mountain Bike’ Braunstein-Quay Gallery Show

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From the Pro’s Closet: 1989 Otis Guy from the ‘Art of the Mountain Bike’ Braunstein-Quay Gallery Show

For this edition From the Pro’s Closet, we present the unique 1989 Otis Guy mountain bike, built with Suntour, which was displayed at the Braunstein-Quay Gallery ‘Art of the Mountain Bike’ showcase. The current owner, who is loaning this bike to the Pro’s Closet sent over the story of how he acquired this unique ride, so read on below for Eric‘s words and yes, the chain is out of alignment in the photos. John blames that on the bright sun… ;) Check out the full spread below!

WZRD Bikes: Em’s Personal Collection

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WZRD Bikes: Em’s Personal Collection

A framebuilder’s personal collection is a window into their mainstays and their experiments. Yesterday we brought you the story of BC-based builder WZRD. bikes, where Em is expressing their viewpoint on the world through fillet brazing, progressive geometry, and progressive politics.

Today we take a look at three bikes Em has built for themselves: their BCXC “big” bike, their XCXC “little” bike, and their 26” park bike. These three bikes, WZRD. frames 11, 18, and 22 respectively, represent a lot of what Em is up to with WZRD.™ geometry, but is just skimming the surface of what they’re up to down in that dungeon.

These bikes are all ridden, HARD. That means they’re not perfect and that’s exactly how it should be. Since these are Em’s personal bikes, I’m going to pass the mic to them now. Make sure to click through to the gallery to peep all the details.

Inside / Out at WZRD. bikes

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Inside / Out at WZRD. bikes

In a dank and dark industrial basement lies the realm of a modern wizard’s apprentice, where they envision, then create their disruption. Where they derive their power and what sacrifices have been made to get to this point are a mystery, though the products of their spells are obvious: rideable works of art, built to enable transcendence for those lucky enough to partake.

While Em has been known as the WZRD. for many years, I feel like they truly began their apprenticeship when they began crafting their dreams from raw steel. Harnessing the divine intelligence of ancient magic, Em’s long-standing moniker became their expressive direction. The alchemy and creativity of the craft became their passion, but this is no average wizard.

WZRD. bikes officially launched in early 2020 with a focus on progressive geometry and progressive politics. Unapologetic about their radical ideologies, Em forges forward. At the front of the wave, WZRD. geometry is the kind of thing you’re going to see on “progressive” production bikes in years to come. That’s always been the beauty of custom, but not all custom builders have such radical ideals.

Based in Victoria, BC, at the southern tip of Vancouver Island, Em’s designs are inspired by their own relationship with the environment as much as the shortcomings they see in production bikes. We’ll get a bit deeper into the numbers side of Em’s bikes tomorrow, but suffice to say they like their reach long, their bottom brackets low, their seat angles steep, and their head angles slack.

The RockShox Rudy XPLR Gravel Fork and SRAM AXS XPLR on John’s Sklar Gravel Bike

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The RockShox Rudy XPLR Gravel Fork and SRAM AXS XPLR on John’s Sklar Gravel Bike

We joke that time is a flat circle in cycling all too often. Gravel bikes are just ’90s mountain bikes, etc. Yet, we have to accept that we’re in an era of electronic shifting and yes, suspension forks on gravel bikes. This tech, however, is nothing new especially not for RockShox, who for the 1994 Paris Roubaix unveiled a suspension fork on team Lemond GAN’s bikes. In that same year, Mavic even had some Zap electronic groups on the exact same bikes.

Now, 27 years later, we have my Sklar gravel bike which is familiar to most of you, with a suspension fork and electronic shifting, under the banner of SRAM and RockShox’s new XPLR lineup (explore, not explorer). While I haven’t taken on the Hell of the North, I have spent a lot of time being a weirdo in the woods on this kit and have a really fun review to share with y’all, so read on below.

The Service Course’s Bikes of Oslo Showcase Features OPEN, Legor, Bella, English, Stribe, and Speedvagen

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The Service Course’s Bikes of Oslo Showcase Features OPEN, Legor, Bella, English, Stribe, and Speedvagen

The Norwegian city of Oslo recently played host to the Service Course Oslo‘s Bikes of Oslo Showcase, featuring a plethora of custom bikes during a weekend of riding and soaking in the summer sun. We’re honored to host the report here, at the Radavist, featuring the bicycle photography of Magnus Nordstrand and the riding/lifestyle shots from Herman Ottesen. Check out the bikes along with an interview with the Service Course’s Jonas Strømberg below…

Ride in Peace Max Kullaway: 333 Fab

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Ride in Peace Max Kullaway: 333 Fab

It is with a heavy heart that we have to share the news that Max Kullaway from 333 Fab passed away after spending years fighting cancer. His wife posted on Facebook this morning announcing the sad news. We’d like to extend warm thoughts and love to all who knew Max and to all of his customers, his legacy now lives with you. Ride in peace, buddy.

See you on the other side of the pass.

xo

If you can and would like to support his family, you can at this GoFundMe.