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Are You Going to the Oregan Trail Gravel Grinder?

Radar

Are You Going to the Oregan Trail Gravel Grinder?

This weekend, June 19th – 23rd, is the Oregon Trail Gravel Grinder. It’s a point-to-point stage race along the Oregon Trail. For five days and 400 miles, racers and riders will venture into the Cascade Range, get covered in dust, sweat, and then arrive at camp each night, where they can recover and prepare for the next day. If you’re going, we’d love to hear from you, especially if you plan on riding the course and taking photos along the way. Drop a line in the comments and email us.

Colin Strickland’s DK200 Winning Allied Able

Radar

Colin Strickland’s DK200 Winning Allied Able

With Lael and Rue’s exceptional DKXL piece up on the site today, I thought the DK200 winner’s bike would make for a nice addition to today’s coverage. Colin Strickland is a friend from when I lived in Texas. He used to crush the road and ‘cross races and now with his new team, Meteor x Giordana with Kevin Girkins, he’s had great success at the Belgian Waffle Ride and the DK200. Allied has an exceptional bike check up on their blog, so if you’re interested in reading about Colin’s setup, the new Allied Able, you should head on over to check it out.

Cirrus Cycles’ Kinekt Suspension Seatposts

Radar

Cirrus Cycles’ Kinekt Suspension Seatposts

With Dirty Kanza, Lost & Found, as well as other gravel events approaching this weekend, it’s always entertaining to see how racers outfit their bikes for long, hard rides. When it comes to 100+ miles of dirt roads, your wrists and quite frankly, ass will take a beating. With brands like Redshift offering suspension stems, brands like Cirrus Cycles look to offer a coil sprung seat post option for giving your tush some more compliance with their Kinekt line. Cirrus makes both carbon (pictured for $329) and aluminum suspension posts (for $249), in various weight classes to offer a more compliant ride for 27.2 drop bar bikes.

Check out more information at Cirrus Cycles.

Sea Otter Classic 2019: Niner Bikes’ MCR 9 RDO Prototype Full Suspension All Road

Reportage

Sea Otter Classic 2019: Niner Bikes’ MCR 9 RDO Prototype Full Suspension All Road

Whoa whoa whoa. What? Last year we saw a plastic shelled prototype of Niner’s full suspension all road, the MCR 9 RDO, and this year at Sea Otter, the brand teased an updated prototype, to the shock and awe of trail shredders and roadies alike.

Niner calls the MCR 9 RDO their Magic Carpet Ride, alluding to the cushy feel that full suspension offers all-day gravel racers. Their theory is the suspension allows riders to run their tires at higher pressures, avoiding snakebite tire tears, rim damage, and less rolling resistance, all with 50mm x 27.5 clearance. Their CVA design – constant varying arc – boasts modified leverage ratios for less travel and total lockout maximizes energy on pavement climbs. The frame is made from Niner’s RDO carbon layup, with one piece forged linkages, has a removable front derailleur mounts and has full sleeve internal routing.

While this bike might not be for everyone, it is cool to see. If you’re feeling this design, let Niner know in the comments and be on the lookout for the MCR 9 RDO late 2019.

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Follow Niner on Instagram and follow Rebecca Rusch on Instagram.

Racing Along the Ruta del Jefe in the San Rafael Valley

Reportage

Racing Along the Ruta del Jefe in the San Rafael Valley

Over the past few years, there’s been an awakening of sorts within my scope of reporting and documenting cycling: when I travel to cover an event, or set out to ride in even a familiar landscape, I like to know the geopolitical, geographical, and geological history of the land in which I’ll be pedaling across, over and through. As much as this awareness contributes to a better understanding of the land we all recreate on, it’s also a way to pay respects to the prior inhabitants of these fragile landscapes.

This interest in the background and history of a place was a large motivation for me to take part in the Ruta del Jefe: a race through the San Rafael Valley, and Santa Rita Mountains, coordinated by Sarah Swallow. Last weekend, the race went down, and up for that matter, all around the San Rafael Valley, but the weekend had much more on the agenda than just riding bikes: it was a lesson for us all in how to sustainably use the land and how we could offer up our recreation as a resource.