#Rivendell

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John’s Rivendell Hunqapillar 29er Klunker: AKA the Klunkapillar

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John’s Rivendell Hunqapillar 29er Klunker: AKA the Klunkapillar

Cruiser, Klunker, ATB.  These terms get thrown around a lot and yet they represent pretty much the same thing: a rigid mountain bike. For me, the granularity of these denotations is intriguing. In modern times, these words have people debating about the proper nomenclature for each of these bikes, and there are opinions on every side of this argument. For those curious, I understand that a Cruiser is a coaster-brake bike with no gears and no hand brakes. A Klunker is a rigid mountain bike with gears and hand brakes. An ATB is simply an “all-terrain-bicycle” and was historically used to refer to a mountain bike with flat bars. “ATB” was used to denote a new, increasingly popular form of cycling at the time: “off-road” riding. AKA, riding on dirt, not pavement. Since the genesis of the term “ATB”, it has been co-opted to mean drop bar bikes as well. Being the trend-setter he is, once Ultraromance dubbed these bikes “ATB,” everyone jumped on board.

Time is a flat circle, like a wheel, so what was once a pariah in the cycling industry is bound to become the savior at one point. That’s kind of how mountain biking started, right? A bunch of misfits took the hills of Marin and the mountains of Colorado and began riding inappropriate bikes inappropriately.

Then, thirty-odd years later, Grant Petersen of Bridgestone and Rivendell fame designed the Hunqapillar, a true-to-form Klunker. I first rode one back in 2014 and immediately was drawn to the bike’s capabilities and unique ride quality. Yet, for some dumb reason, I didn’t buy one and missed out on every opportunity to own a size 62cm until recently. So why did the guy with too many bikes buy a Hunq? Well, read on below to find out.

Hope Cyclery Builds: Andrew’s Rivendell Platypus

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Hope Cyclery Builds: Andrew’s Rivendell Platypus

I met Andrew years ago at a fat bike event we hosted here in Johnstown, PA. Playing polo and ripping around the parking lot on the big bouncy bikes looked like something fun to him. Until that moment, Andrew had visited several shops locally and always got the glance; you know the look if you’re outside of the “normal” scope of a cyclist, whether that’s your size, appearance, or, hell, I’ve been in the industry for nearly 20 years and I still get the look. Those eyes and words can pierce through all the stoke you may have as a larger cyclist, and make you give up before you even get to start your love affair with bicycles.

2021 Philly Bike Expo: Rivendell’s Wolbis Slugstone

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2021 Philly Bike Expo: Rivendell’s Wolbis Slugstone

Leave it to Rivendell to create a new genre of bike design that harkens back to a simpler time in cycling history, while also employing modern production methods and componentry. The Susie W. Longbolts/ Wolbis Slugstone and it’s heavier-duty cousin, the Gus Boots Willsen, are what Rivendell refers to as “hillibikes.” Their design is modern, but their overall concept is influenced by early mountain bikes ridden on Mt Tamalpais, north of San Fransisco, in the ’80s. And, by the way, their names are all anagrams of each other. Rivendell had a decked-out Wolbis at this year’s Philly Bike Expo where Jarrod Bunk caught up with them to photograph the build and learn more about these hillbikes from Rivendell’s Will Keating.

Rivendell’s New Peace Wheel T-Shirts

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Rivendell’s New Peace Wheel T-Shirts

When Rivendell posted this graphic the other day on their Instagram, all I could think is how great of a graphic it is and how we can all use a little hope. Today, Rivendell announced these new shirts… and there’s a good cause driving their sales:

“Seven dollars from each shirt go to a local POC who works in a grocery store and whose dream is to get a down payment on a house so he and five family members can live there. I believe in him, I’ve given him a decent amount myself, it’s not a con, but it’s not the kind of thing you can write off on your taxes, and he has no idea anything is coming. We’ll match your $7, so—you get a groovy Peace Wheel Shirt and he gets $14. That will put him over the top two years sooner than he’d be able to working alone. We’ll report if it works. Yes, a crazy idea, but by modern T-shirt standards this is more than a $25 shirt, anyway, so it’s no like you’re paying more for it just because it helps this person.”

A good cause and a great design goes a long way. If you can, show your support and scoop one of these shirts at the Rivendell webshop.

A Hope Cyclery Build: David’s Rivendell (c)Hillborne

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A Hope Cyclery Build: David’s Rivendell (c)Hillborne

Somewhere along David‘s journey in 2019, where he spent weeks riding from New York through Pennsylvania and moving across the country from LA to Johnstown, something clicked and it was time to look for something a bit lighter to replace his long-loved Rocky Moutain Sherpa. That bike had seen a lot of miles over the years and the weight, well let’s just say it’s stout.

A ‘Send It Safely’ Rivendell Sam Hillborne

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A ‘Send It Safely’ Rivendell Sam Hillborne

Send it Safely? What’s that? Nick lives in Albuquerque, where he’s got a good group of riding buddies that enjoy taking to the local trails on their singlespeeds. When he first moved to town, he was jarred by the lack of trail etiquette, mostly by cyclists. Mountain bikers would plow downhill, hardly even yielding for hikers or other riders. For those unaware, uphill traffic always has the right of way. That’s when Nick thought of the phrase “send it safely” and started making stickers.

It was through these stickers that I first got to know Nick. Well, as well as you can know someone on the internet. Admittedly, I haven’t been to ABQ once since moving here, as we’re trying to play it safe during the pandemic, so Nick and I had never met before the afternoon I shot his Rivendell Sam Hillborne

Ben’s Rivendell Rosco Bubbe Baby Carrier

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Ben’s Rivendell Rosco Bubbe Baby Carrier

When you become a parent you start to ask the really hard questions, like what kind of amazing bike am I going to build to haul my little kiddo around?  Ben was lucky enough to snag this Rivendell Rosco Bubbe from Alex at Yellow Haus Bicycles when he was clearing out some inventory.  This may look like your average Clem Smith, but nay, this is a Rosco Bubbe experiment. This frame was designed to have a longer top tube to accommodate kid carrier as we see here.  The longer space makes room for the carrier and the rider to fit in the space between the saddle and bars.  This bike is technically Chelsea, Ben’s wife’s rig but it luckily fits them both so they can both take Marcel out for a spin.

Rivendell’s New 60cm Tosco Bar comes in 31.8 and 25.4 Clamp or 1 1/8 Direct Clamp

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Rivendell’s New 60cm Tosco Bar comes in 31.8 and 25.4 Clamp or 1 1/8 Direct Clamp

Looking to offer its newest bar in a variety of clamp sizes and specs, the newest Rivendell handlebar is one for the masses. The Tosco mid-rise bar fills out the Bosco family of bars. The Bosco is a high-rise, the Losco (a Blue Lug bar) is low-rise. If you don’t like the standard 25.4mm clamp diameter, well there are options for that. You can order a Tosco in a 31.8mm clamp or a direct-to-steerer 1 1/8″ direct mount (pictured). These bars retail for $60 ($120 for direct clamp) and are in stock at Rivendell right now.

Jason’s Rivendell Sam Hillborne… It Tastes a Bit Like Socks

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Jason’s Rivendell Sam Hillborne… It Tastes a Bit Like Socks

This is a story of how progressive values and a penchant for both unusual bikes and unusual beer can combine to create the ultimate rambling ride. Most bike designs fit into neat little categories, and while those neat little categories work for most people, there’s a wild world of flavour out there, if you’re willing to take a risk here or there.

Rivendell Bicycle Works Offers Black Reparations Pricing

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Rivendell Bicycle Works Offers Black Reparations Pricing

This just in from our friends at Rivendell

Starting October 12, Rivendell Bicycle Works, the 26-year-old San Francisco Bay Area bicycle company, is rolling out reparations pricing for Black customers.

Rivendell’s CEO, Grant Petersen says, “The American bicycle industry has been racist, often overtly racist, since 1878, and Rivendell has been obliviously—not “obviously”— racist ever since 1994. We say this not to scold the industry, not to scold other bicycle businesses, and not to be on-trend.

For the last two years, Rivendell Bicycle Works has offered a 45 percent discount to Black customers who shopped in person. COVID has curtailed that. They are going national with the same plan, but now with a name and an acronym: Black Reparations Pricing (BRP).

Ten percent of Rivendell’s bikes and frames will be allocated for BRP. In the 12-month period beginning October 2020, they’ll make about 850 bikes, 85 of which will be set aside for the discount program.

In its BRP plan, Rivendell adds, “Racism doesn’t respond to inaction or self-proclamation. In other words, it doesn’t go away when you know, even in your bones, that all people are created equal. It responds to anti-racist action. Reparations are an example. Not because Reparations are “a nice thing to do,” but because they’re owed.

Reparations acknowledge that, in this country, white wealth—recent or inherited/generational, has been ‘earned’ by the labor of Black people, who, even after slavery, were never given a leg up. Your non-Black tycoon great-grampa may have been born poor, may have been a sharp and clever go-getter at the top of his class, but he wasn’t born Black.”

Rivendell is also offering its customers the opportunity to contribute to the BRP fund with every purchase they make.

For further information about BRP, please follow this link:
https://www.rivbike.com/pages/black-reparations-pricing

To contact Rivendell regarding this story, please email john@rivbike.com