#Rivendell

tag

Readers’ Rides: Eric’s Rivendell Appaloosa – A Love Letter To a Build

Radar

Readers’ Rides: Eric’s Rivendell Appaloosa – A Love Letter To a Build

Our Readers’ Rides showcases builds from the readership. Sometimes they’re succinct and to the point and other times, we get wonderfully penned novellas, waxing poetic about their beloved bikes. These submissions are part product review and part passionate penning. This week is one of those submissions. Eric’s Rivendell Appaloosa was featured in Wednesday’s Radar Roundup, albeit in video form, so let’s check it out in words and photos below!

John’s Rivendell Hunqapillar 29er Klunker: AKA the Klunkapillar

Reportage

John’s Rivendell Hunqapillar 29er Klunker: AKA the Klunkapillar

Cruiser, Klunker, ATB.  These terms get thrown around a lot and yet they represent pretty much the same thing: a rigid mountain bike. For me, the granularity of these denotations is intriguing. In modern times, these words have people debating about the proper nomenclature for each of these bikes, and there are opinions on every side of this argument. For those curious, I understand that a Cruiser is a coaster-brake bike with no gears and no hand brakes. A Klunker is a rigid mountain bike with gears and hand brakes. An ATB is simply an “all-terrain-bicycle” and was historically used to refer to a mountain bike with flat bars. “ATB” was used to denote a new, increasingly popular form of cycling at the time: “off-road” riding. AKA, riding on dirt, not pavement. Since the genesis of the term “ATB”, it has been co-opted to mean drop bar bikes as well. Being the trend-setter he is, once Ultraromance dubbed these bikes “ATB,” everyone jumped on board.

Time is a flat circle, like a wheel, so what was once a pariah in the cycling industry is bound to become the savior at one point. That’s kind of how mountain biking started, right? A bunch of misfits took the hills of Marin and the mountains of Colorado and began riding inappropriate bikes inappropriately.

Then, thirty-odd years later, Grant Petersen of Bridgestone and Rivendell fame designed the Hunqapillar, a true-to-form Klunker. I first rode one back in 2014 and immediately was drawn to the bike’s capabilities and unique ride quality. Yet, for some dumb reason, I didn’t buy one and missed out on every opportunity to own a size 62cm until recently. So why did the guy with too many bikes buy a Hunq? Well, read on below to find out.

Hope Cyclery Builds: Andrew’s Rivendell Platypus

Reportage

Hope Cyclery Builds: Andrew’s Rivendell Platypus

I met Andrew years ago at a fat bike event we hosted here in Johnstown, PA. Playing polo and ripping around the parking lot on the big bouncy bikes looked like something fun to him. Until that moment, Andrew had visited several shops locally and always got the glance; you know the look if you’re outside of the “normal” scope of a cyclist, whether that’s your size, appearance, or, hell, I’ve been in the industry for nearly 20 years and I still get the look. Those eyes and words can pierce through all the stoke you may have as a larger cyclist, and make you give up before you even get to start your love affair with bicycles.

2021 Philly Bike Expo: Rivendell’s Wolbis Slugstone

Reportage

2021 Philly Bike Expo: Rivendell’s Wolbis Slugstone

Leave it to Rivendell to create a new genre of bike design that harkens back to a simpler time in cycling history, while also employing modern production methods and componentry. The Susie W. Longbolts/ Wolbis Slugstone and it’s heavier-duty cousin, the Gus Boots Willsen, are what Rivendell refers to as “hillibikes.” Their design is modern, but their overall concept is influenced by early mountain bikes ridden on Mt Tamalpais, north of San Fransisco, in the ’80s. And, by the way, their names are all anagrams of each other. Rivendell had a decked-out Wolbis at this year’s Philly Bike Expo where Jarrod Bunk caught up with them to photograph the build and learn more about these hillbikes from Rivendell’s Will Keating.

Rivendell’s New Peace Wheel T-Shirts

Radar

Rivendell’s New Peace Wheel T-Shirts

When Rivendell posted this graphic the other day on their Instagram, all I could think is how great of a graphic it is and how we can all use a little hope. Today, Rivendell announced these new shirts… and there’s a good cause driving their sales:

“Seven dollars from each shirt go to a local POC who works in a grocery store and whose dream is to get a down payment on a house so he and five family members can live there. I believe in him, I’ve given him a decent amount myself, it’s not a con, but it’s not the kind of thing you can write off on your taxes, and he has no idea anything is coming. We’ll match your $7, so—you get a groovy Peace Wheel Shirt and he gets $14. That will put him over the top two years sooner than he’d be able to working alone. We’ll report if it works. Yes, a crazy idea, but by modern T-shirt standards this is more than a $25 shirt, anyway, so it’s no like you’re paying more for it just because it helps this person.”

A good cause and a great design goes a long way. If you can, show your support and scoop one of these shirts at the Rivendell webshop.