#touring-bike

tag

Salsa Updates the Cutthroat Tour Divide Bike for 2020

Reportage

Salsa Updates the Cutthroat Tour Divide Bike for 2020

In 2015, I was able to partake in the launch of the Cutthroat, Salsa’s Tour Divide Race Bike, a unique drop bar 29er and since then, I’ve had zero contact with it. That is until I unboxed the brand new 2020 Cutthroat, which is full of new updates and boy is it a long list. While I plan on reviewing this bike in more detail further down the road, I wanted to give you a look at the new model on its launch day. Read on below for a first look at the new Cutty.

Readers’ Rides: Justin’s Moots Psychlo-X

Radar

Readers’ Rides: Justin’s Moots Psychlo-X

A few years back, we would post the bikes from the readers of this site, in a feature dubbed Readers’ Rides. Well, we’ve been getting a bunch of inquiries over the years as to if or when we’re bringing these posts back and the answer is yes! They will be cut and dry, down and dirty, cell phone style photos. As you can imagine, this will open the torrent of submissions, so hold tight until I can set up a new email address for this next week.

After yesterday’s OysterBar post, the designer of the bar shared his Moots and a little back story. I thought it was a perfect seque into relaunching this fun feature…

The Swift X Kona Rove ST Touring Bike

Radar

The Swift X Kona Rove ST Touring Bike

With only 201 models in circulation, this Swift Industries x Kona Rove ST is a very limited edition project. Built for touring, the Rove ST comes with a limited edition headbadge, Tubus Tara Big Apple front Lowrider rack, fenders with mudflaps, limited edition Swift Industries bags, and Shimano’s GRX 600/800 group. If you’re in the Seattle area, you can rent this bike from Swift Adventure Co. Check out more photos below and all the details at Kona.

Velo Orange Announces Complete Polyvalent and Piolet Complete Bikes

Radar

Velo Orange Announces Complete Polyvalent and Piolet Complete Bikes

Velo Orange has historically only offered their  Polyvalent and Piolet as framesets until now. They just announced the details of their new Complete Polyvalent and Piolet Complete Bikes. The Polyvalent has two build kits:  Drop Bar or Upright Bar. Both options come with SRAM 11 speed kits, a full-component kit of VO parts and accessories, and Teravail 650bx47mm Rampart Tires. Polyvalent Complete: $2,400 USD

The Piolet features their Curvy Bars and an 11 speed Shimano SLX drivetrain, Deore Hydraulic Brakes, and Teravail 29×2.4 Honcho Tires (or 26×2.4 Maxxis Ardent for the Small size). Piolet Complete: $2,200 USD

Head to Velo Orange for more details and read Morgan’s review of the Polyvalent here.

Radar

Rideable

Rideable follows Steven Mortinson and Brian Donnelly as they ride two cheap bikes to the Oregon Coast and back with a surfboard in tow.

Al Morris’ Occult of Cyclocamping Rivendell Sam Hillborne

Reportage

Al Morris’ Occult of Cyclocamping Rivendell Sam Hillborne

I’ve always jokingly called Rivendell Bicycles a Luddite cult of rim brakes lead by the charismatic Grant Peterson wielding his fistful of seatpost and wool undies. All kidding aside, I’d be honored to own a Rivendell, they are amazing and beautiful bikes made by great people, but as the first mechanic I worked under told me oh-so-many years ago, “Grant doesn’t sell his bikes to hipsters” as a response to my ogling of one of their bikes. So, I guess I’m outta luck. Anywho, when I pinged Al about his Sam Hillborne for some stories or insight into the build the first thing he said was, “The purple, white and black motif was inspired by the Heavens Gate cult of California when they left earth for the UFO behind the Hale-Bopp comet. That’s where the colorway came from.” Whelp there ya have it folks, a “bicycle cult” frame built around the color scheme of an actual cult, my low-hanging-fruit-esoteric-bike-nerd joke had come full circle.

Golden Saddle Rides: Mick from 100 Tacos’ Crust Nor’Easter Dirty Tourer

Reportage

Golden Saddle Rides: Mick from 100 Tacos’ Crust Nor’Easter Dirty Tourer

A bike that’s perfect for its one imperfection. Mick hasn’t ever owned a new bike. Not new, new. Like pulling a brand new frame out of a box, new. It’s not that he was opposed to new bikes, he just never really found a company or a frame that fit his ideologies. Over the past few months however, Crust Bikes‘ offerings have really piqued his interest. He works at Golden Saddle Cyclery, a shop that churns out balleur Crust builds all the time. When he saw the new Nor’Easter, it strummed his heartstrings.

Tour Divide Race: Part 5

Reportage

Tour Divide Race: Part 5

Tour Divide Race: Part 5

Words by Spencer Harding

We wake up with dew covering our tents and sleeping bags just on the south side of La Manga Pass in northern New Mexico.  We send Lael on her way as we start our seven-hour journey to jump ahead and try to catch Chris Seistrup at the head of the pack.  As we roll through the outskirts of Albuquerque it seems impossibly hot after almost two weeks high in the mountains.  As we approach Silver City a massive monsoon is building up over the Gila National Forest, no chance the leaders are staying dry out there.  Over a late dinner, we watch Chris’ spot tracker go stagnant and decided to wait until he rolls into town in the morning. 

Jones Bikes: the Complete LWB Boxed Bicycle

Radar

Jones Bikes: the Complete LWB Boxed Bicycle

After the success of the Jones Plus SWB, or short wheel base, completes last year, Jones announced the launching of the LWB, or long wheel base, complete this morning. Whereas the Jones Plus SWB is a smaller bike overall, with 27.5×2.8-3.25″ tires, the Jones Plus LWB is a larger bike, designed to fit 29×2.8-3.25″ tires. The Jones Plus LWB is boxed and ready to ride for $2050 in either a knobby or a road slick tire option. Check out more details below, or head to Jones to read up!

Sam’s Black Sheep Lifetime Bike

Reportage

Sam’s Black Sheep Lifetime Bike

Titanium bikes. They’re often referred to as “lifetime bikes” due to the metal’s oxide barrier, inhibiting it from rusting in the traditional sense of the word. A Ti bike will last for a lifetime with its only limiting factor being the technology of the components and the riders ability to adapt the bike as their tastes in life change. So yes, in essence, a titanium bike can be a lifetime bike, but how often are they really? Well, working at Summit Bike and Ski in Bozeman, I found a true to form “lifetime bike.”