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Golden Saddle Rides: Mick from 100 Tacos’ Crust Nor’Easter Dirty Tourer

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Golden Saddle Rides: Mick from 100 Tacos’ Crust Nor’Easter Dirty Tourer

A bike that’s perfect for its one imperfection. Mick hasn’t ever owned a new bike. Not new, new. Like pulling a brand new frame out of a box, new. It’s not that he was opposed to new bikes, he just never really found a company or a frame that fit his ideologies. Over the past few months however, Crust Bikes‘ offerings have really piqued his interest. He works at Golden Saddle Cyclery, a shop that churns out balleur Crust builds all the time. When he saw the new Nor’Easter, it strummed his heartstrings.

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Shred on You Krusty Diamond… VIDEO!

This bike was one of my favorite shoots last year and now Travis gives you a look at it in the latest video from Paul Component Engineering. Did you miss the original gallery? Check it out in the Related sidebar to the left!

Special Edition PAUL Somethin’ Somethin’ For the Radavist

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Special Edition PAUL Somethin’ Somethin’ For the Radavist

Over in Chico, Travis from PAUL had an idea, inspired from a certain band from the 80’s and wanted to do a fun product for the readers of this website. Splatter ano, like this band, had its heyday in the 1980’s and without giving you a direct link, if you search for the band’s name this color combination represents, it’ll take you to a special page where you can pick one of these special Somethin’ Somethin’ up.

We’ll give you two hints. The first being: this band was formed by two brothers, who were born in the Netherlands and moved to Pasadena, California in the early 60’s. The second: two lead singers were prominent during this band’s lifespan, which continues today.

If you head to PAUL and add in the answer to the search bar, it’ll take you straight to the product. For whatever reason, y’all can’t figure this out, express your concern in the comments…

SORRY TO ALL YOU VAN HALEN FANS, THESE ARE SOLD OUT!

Paul Component Engineering: 35mm Shorty Box Stem

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Paul Component Engineering: 35mm Shorty Box Stem

In the world of modern mountain bikes, shorter stems are usually better, and that’s the motivation for Paul Component’s newest version of the Box Stem. These made in Chico stems now come in a 35mm length and weigh only 118grams. They’re in stock now at Paul. I can’t wait to put one on my mountain bike and on my touring bike.

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Paul’s Custom Salsa

This Ross Shafer-built, custom MTB from the 90’s was made especially for Paul of Paul Component Engineering. Check out this video for all kinds of tidbits from the early days of Salsa and Paul, for that matter!

Golden Saddle Rides: Hunter Cycles Rigid 29r

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Golden Saddle Rides: Hunter Cycles Rigid 29r

I’ve long admired the work of Rick Hunter, yet have never been able to get ahold of one in my size. Especially since he has closed his order queue. My thoughts were, one day a frame would pop up in my size and I’d have to swoop on it. That’s what happened, in a nutshell, when I drove up to Chico, California to hang out with Paul Component Engineering for a few days. The trip coincided with the recent Paul Camp, a media gathering at the Paul shop, featuring eleven bikes, built by select framebuilders, all around a joint theme: a monster cross or mountain bike. Oh, and the bikes had to use the same color scheme: red, white and blue. As a group, these bikes were marvelous and I had a blast both riding and photographing them, especially this very frame…

Klamper Solution on My Stinner Hardtail

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Klamper Solution on My Stinner Hardtail

I’m not sure how many of you caught this in the gallery showcasing my Stinner hardtail but we ran into an issue when building the bike up. I wanted to run Klampers on this bike, since I’m using it for some bikepacking trips in the near future and I really liked the way the Retrotec I rode at Paul Camp’s Klamper brakes felt with the short pull lever. So, when I bought the frame from Stinner, we began building it and ran into a problem. It’s a common issue, when a frame is designed to run modern hydraulic disc brakes and you try to run a cable actuated brake like the Klamper, with its high cable entry point. Basically, if we ran the cable through the braze-on and into the Klamper, it wouldn’t work; the bend was too abrupt for the cable.

When I brought it up to Aaron at Stinner, he suggested using a V-Brake noodle, so I passed the idea off to Mike at Golden Saddle Cyclery. This is what he worked up. A simple noodle, with rubber heat shrink tubing around the metal part, so it won’t scratch the seatstay. Personally, I think this is an elegant solution.