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Cane Creek Dips their EE Wings in Rainbow

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Cane Creek Dips their EE Wings in Rainbow

If you love the look of Cane Creek’s ma EE Wings cranks but wanted to know what they’d look like covered in LSD-induced unicorn pee, well, today is your day. These cranks look insane. $1,100 insane but wow. I love that the team at Cane Creek had this epiphany. Head on over to Cane Creek to see more details and if you’re a big balleur, to order.

Race Face’s New and Affordable Aeffect R Cranks and Dropper

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Race Face’s New and Affordable Aeffect R Cranks and Dropper

Today Race Face announced two budget products, that look like appealing options for those building out a MTB. The new Aeffect R cranks ($129.99) are made from 7075 aluminum and weigh only 632 grams, while the new Aeffect Dropper ($199.99) is cable actuated and weighs 540 grams. The dropper does not come with a lever, but Race Face sells a compatible one for $39.99. Both product weights very based on spec. These new products, along with Race Face’s entire lineup are available for order from your local dealer, so hop over to Race Face to see more specs.

Cane Creek and LaMere Cycles: Ti eeWings Fat Bike Cranks

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Cane Creek and LaMere Cycles: Ti eeWings Fat Bike Cranks

Cane Creek Cycling Components and LaMere Cycles just announced the pre-order for their eeWings Titanium cranks optimized for modern fat bike hub and bottom bracket standards. The fatbike crank kit will come with a longer bottom bracket spindle to allow for optimal frame clearance and q-factor.

LaMere Cycles will be selling the eeWings fat bike cranks as an option on their complete bike models or aftermarket consumer-direct at a retail of $1049. Those interested in pre-ordering can do so now at Lamere Cycles with expected delivery in November. Check out more specifications below.

Rotor’s New Kapic Carbon Cranks

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Rotor’s New Kapic Carbon Cranks

The Kapic cranks are Rotor’s lightest yet, weighing only 429g for a 175mm crankset with a 32t chainring. These cranks were made to withstand races like the Cape Epic and hold onto the quality of product Rotor is known for. See more at Rotor.

INGRID’s L2 and G Cranksets are Made in Italy

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INGRID’s L2 and G Cranksets are Made in Italy

INGRID is an Italian manufacturer, making parts for road, MTB, cross, and all road bikes. From cranks to chainrings, their precision machined components are of the utmost quality and carry an aesthetic, unlike anything I’ve seen come from Italy before. I saw them on a beautiful Legor Cicli All Road at Eroica – which we’ll look at later this week – and I think it’s safe to say, the indicator of a well-designed crank is that it compliments the overall build, not take away from it. Head on over to INGRID to see their full lineup.

Biciclista.US is the US-distributor for INGRID and their lightweight L2 (430g) and G cranksets (620g) are in stock now. See more specs below.

The Return of Chater Lea?

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The Return of Chater Lea?


Photos via Fixed Gear Gallery

Anyone who’s dabbled in the world of vintage British path racers has surely heard this name before. I almost bought some Chater Lea cottered cranks and “sprint” pedals on a Higgins Path Racer years ago and a recent press release not only hints at the brand’s return, but states that the best of Britain’s foremost engineering minds from the world of Formula 1 are on board for the relaunch. I’m very into this news and cannot wait to actually see something come from this project.

Check out the press-release below.

MTB Tech for Road and Cross Bikes: Easton’s EC90 SL Cranks Get the Thumbs Up!

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MTB Tech for Road and Cross Bikes: Easton’s EC90 SL Cranks Get the Thumbs Up!

It was a game changer when 1x drivetrains made the leap from mountain bikes to drop bar bikes. Last year when RaceFace purchased Easton, the merger promised a bit of cross-pollination between RaceFace’s MTB technology and Easton’s road 1x systems. The EC90 SL crank adopted RaceFace’s Cinch system, allowing it to utilize direct mount 1x chainrings and direct mount 2x spiders, all in a road q-factor and chainline. This makes for an incredibly versatile crank interface that not only looks good, but in my opinion, out performs many other cranks. I’ve been riding the EC90 SL cranks on my firefly with a 38t direct mount on SRAM’s 1x Force system with a 10-42t cassette. Mounting them was easy, and there’s a new found confidence in Easton’s beefy bottom bracket. Especially when compared to SRAM’s GXP offering which always seems to creak right out of the box.

Easton’s EC90 SL Cranks are Made in Canada

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Easton’s EC90 SL Cranks are Made in Canada

When Race Face bought Easton a few years back, the company received a thorough makeover, resulting in the EC90 cranks. These hollow carbon crank arms are made in Canada, feature a 149mm Q-Factor, 30mm spindle, are optimized for 2x or 1x performance and come with a bottom bracket. Make sure you check out the EC90 SL cranks for your next ‘cross build.

SRAM’s New Force and Rival 1 Drivetrains

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SRAM’s New Force and Rival 1 Drivetrains

If you’ve ever wanted more versatility in your cross bike, touring bike or all-road bike on a 1x platform, SRAM’s latest product venture might pique your interest. XX1’s original success has since trickled down on the mountain side to the ever affordable GX plaform and now, both Force and Rival offer 1x drivetrains to accompany CX1.

You can now run up to a 42t cassette on SRAM’s 1x road levers, provided your wheels are 135mm spaced with XD driver compatibility. Or, opt for the standard 11-speed 11-36 cassette. With a range of X-Sync chainrings, you can achieve a wide range on your road bike as well.

Personally, I’m pretty stoked to see this versatility now offered from SRAM and can’t wait to see what else is to come from 1x road offerings. For some reason, I can’t help but gravitate towards the idea of a 48t Chainring with a 11-42t setup…

Check out a few more photos below and see more at SRAM.

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Hope Tech: It’s Grim Up North – Showcases New Cranks

Hope’s made in the UK products are top notch and to help create a buzz around their new cranks, they went up North to ride in what many would consider grim conditions with team riders Craig Evans and Sam Flanagan. I’m liking what I see with those cranks, and everything in Hope’s catalog these days. They really are putting in solid work.

Check out a great feature on the Hope Cranks at their site. Availability is slated for late January.

Well Used: White Industries VBC Cranks

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Well Used: White Industries VBC Cranks

Even I was a bit skeptical about the ability for my Geekhouse Woodville to throw from a 50t to a 32t consistently, using White Industries’ VBC cranks. But more importantly, I was interested in seeing how the crank arms and rings would hold up to daily use. Well, the front derailleur still throws just fine and they haven’t shown much wear at all. Go figure.

With around 10 months of heavy use, as you can see, they’re still kicking and show very little ‘tooth decay’. There’s very little crank arm rub as well. My Woodville is primarily my around-town, errand getter, bar bike and my go-to ‘big fuckin rides’ vehicle of choice. It’s been camping, tackled the MSOJ and blasted through tons of 1-track.

I have to admit, these are some of my favorite cranks I’ve ever owned.

After receiving emails from people, asking to see updates on the drivetrain, I shot a few yesterday. Check out more below.