#ATB

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Introducing the Ron’s Bikes x Crust Bikes Alumalith 27.5 ATB

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Introducing the Ron’s Bikes x Crust Bikes Alumalith 27.5 ATB

Good ol’ Ronnie. How many bikes have we shot together now? It all started with a chance encounter in Austin in 2014 when I documented his Trek 970. Back then, he was known as Benedict and dressed in his post-Wooly Mammoth roadie persona; lumberjack meets blast beats, sprinkled with some Tolkien lore and usually seen astride either a vintage MTB or a Rivendell, dribbling olive oil on his vintage Suntour components. This was early Ultraromance—the genesis of his persona—when he had just begun to crack open the internet with his wild style and über cøøl bikes. I love this man, no matter what name he festoons his internet crown with. Always have. Always will.

Fast forward to the 2022 Philly Bike Expo, where I recently met this gentle yet patinated gent once again to document a bike that picks up where our Duralcan post left off.

The Alumalith is the latest model to be released from the Ron’s Bikes x Crust Bikes cache and the first US-made aluminum bike he’s designed, with Frank the Welder at the helm, speccing tubing diameters and laying down iconic beads on brushed, raw aluminum. Let’s check it out below!

John’s Rivendell Hunqapillar 29er Klunker: AKA the Klunkapillar

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John’s Rivendell Hunqapillar 29er Klunker: AKA the Klunkapillar

Cruiser, Klunker, ATB.  These terms get thrown around a lot and yet they represent pretty much the same thing: a rigid mountain bike. For me, the granularity of these denotations is intriguing. In modern times, these words have people debating about the proper nomenclature for each of these bikes, and there are opinions on every side of this argument. For those curious, I understand that a Cruiser is a coaster-brake bike with no gears and no hand brakes. A Klunker is a rigid mountain bike with gears and hand brakes. An ATB is simply an “all-terrain-bicycle” and was historically used to refer to a mountain bike with flat bars. “ATB” was used to denote a new, increasingly popular form of cycling at the time: “off-road” riding. AKA, riding on dirt, not pavement. Since the genesis of the term “ATB”, it has been co-opted to mean drop bar bikes as well. Being the trend-setter he is, once Ultraromance dubbed these bikes “ATB,” everyone jumped on board.

Time is a flat circle, like a wheel, so what was once a pariah in the cycling industry is bound to become the savior at one point. That’s kind of how mountain biking started, right? A bunch of misfits took the hills of Marin and the mountains of Colorado and began riding inappropriate bikes inappropriately.

Then, thirty-odd years later, Grant Petersen of Bridgestone and Rivendell fame designed the Hunqapillar, a true-to-form Klunker. I first rode one back in 2014 and immediately was drawn to the bike’s capabilities and unique ride quality. Yet, for some dumb reason, I didn’t buy one and missed out on every opportunity to own a size 62cm until recently. So why did the guy with too many bikes buy a Hunq? Well, read on below to find out.

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ENVE’s All Terrain Bicycle (ATB) Challenge!

ENVE just announced the first-ever ATB Challenge. Five challengers will be selected to participate in the ATB-themed reality TV Gameshow that will tackle a yet-to-be-announced course that’s being aptly named the World’s Most Challenging ATB Route. The chosen contestants will have a bike built to their specs, then be flown to a secret, rugged and remote location somewhere in the United States where they’ll be given the opportunity to complete the route. The episodic series will introduce the selected contestants, their story, bike setup, and finally, their day on the World’s most Challenging ATB Route.

On the popular show Alone, contestants choose the gear they believe will give them the best chance of outlasting the other participants when they can rely on nothing but their own survival instincts and the limited gear available. The ATB Challenge isn’t all that different, but rather than receiving fishing line or a saw, the participants will choose between 650b or 700c wheels, flat, riser, or drop bar, and gearing selections in order to create what they believe is the best All Terrain Bicycle to conquer the route. Big watts and a high Vo2 Max won’t be enough to find success on the route – choosing wisely with equipment and being ready for any course challenge that comes their way will more than level the playing field.

See more at All Terrain Bicycle Challenge!