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More than a Throwback: the Yeti ARC 29er Hardtail

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More than a Throwback: the Yeti ARC 29er Hardtail

We’re big into hardtails here at the Radavist. While my personal bikes are all steel, riding carbon bikes can be a real treat, especially when the company has put so much thought into the design.

Yeti has a long history of designing capable and attractive bikes. The original ARC was a collaboration with Easton and the intent was to make a truly lightweight machine in that era. The OG ARC’s aluminum frameset weighed a mere 3.2lbs, which was a groundbreaking accomplishment for 1991 and those bikes are still iconic, even today.

You could say Yeti had a lot riding on this new ARC design and there were a few decisions that set this new model on a different trajectory from its predecessor. After riding this bike for a month here in Santa Fe, I’ve finally wrapped my head around how to review it, pointing out its accomplishments and my own personal critiques of this entirely new model, so read on for more…

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Joey Schusler on the new Yeti ARC

It’s not often we get the pleasure of watching Joey Schusler ride a hardtail! Yeti tried something different with this self-filmed digital and film edit by Joey in the Colorado backcountry.

The Yeti ARC is Back As a Modern, Lightweight 29er Carbon Hardtail

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The Yeti ARC is Back As a Modern, Lightweight 29er Carbon Hardtail

Photo by Bailey Newbrey

… and I’ve been riding one for the past week. The short consensus: it’s gooooood!

Anyone that’s a fan of the legacy of Yeti will know what the ARC represents. The original ARC were lightweight aluminum racebikes and was the epitome of framebuilding tech at the time. Resurrecting the model this year, Yeti took the model and modernized it, building it from their lightweight carbon. Built around 29er wheels and a 130mm fork, the ARC holds its own on trails.

Yes, I’m reviewing the turquoise model… it’s very SouthWestern.

For now, head to Yeti to read all about the new ARC and expect my review next week.

Limited to 100 Units: Yeti Cycles Announces the ARC 35th Anniversary Edition 29er Hardtail

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Limited to 100 Units: Yeti Cycles Announces the ARC 35th Anniversary Edition 29er Hardtail

Brands like Yeti have a rich history to reference and what better time than their 35th anniversary to announce a limited-edition ARC hardtail. Looking back to 1991, the ARC was a collaboration with Yeti and Easton to produce a lightweight race frame. During that time, frames were steel and weighed up to 6lbs. This collaboration resulted in a 3.2lb frameset, making it a dominating factor in races of all classes.

35 years later, this stunning throwback is announced but in a more modern material. These beautiful 29ers are limited to 100 units, in sizes SM-XL, and come built with tons of limited edition turquoise components. Check out all the details below.

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OPEN and Yeti

“I have crossed paths a couple of times with YETI Cycles owner Chris Conroy. We both worked at Scott a while ago (ok almost 25 years…). Back then Scott was the owner of the Yeti- and Schwinn brand. YETI was just the coolest brand out there with a couple of legendary riders and great bikes.” Check out more at OPEN!

2017 NAHBS: W.H. Bradford Designs Yeti Homage

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2017 NAHBS: W.H. Bradford Designs Yeti Homage

W.H. Bradford brought one of the most fun bikes at this year’s NAHBS. This Yeti homage has every detail worked out, from the classic looptail, to the flat top tube and even the fork, there’s not much Brad left out.

Pairing the Yeti turquoise frame with purple anodized Paul Components was the cherry on top.

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Tobacco Roots

Yeti takes on the Tobacco Roots range in their latest video, showcasing some of Montana’s epic scenery and riding.

Second Spin Cycles’ 1985 Yeti Built and Sold by John Parker

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Second Spin Cycles’ 1985 Yeti Built and Sold by John Parker

Second Spin Cycles’ 1985 Yeti Built and Sold by John Parker
Photos by John Watson and words by Martin Kozaczek

Unless you’ve lived in a cave for the past 30 years you’ve probably heard of Yeti Cycles. Not much has changed in that time. The bikes are still turquoise and still made to go fast. Yeti has always stuck to its foundation in racing, and the alumni roster reads like a list on the wall in the Hall of Fame, with names like Tomac, Furtado and Graves just to name a few. Yeti outlasted most of its competition during those years as their bikes have evolved only enough to ensure they are as fast as their racers. Unlike some bike companies that either don’t embrace their past and culture or don’t have one to really rally around, Yeti is all about their history and more importantly, their tribe. If you’ve been to their HQ or one of their annual Tribe gatherings you’re likely to see some of the more significant bikes from their past. That lineup is soon to be joined by the bike featured here, which is the first Yeti ever sold!!! The story goes a little something like this. John Parker bought out the tooling for 26” BMX “Motocruiser” stalwart Bicycle Bob Wilson and his Sweetheart Cycles brand, and welded up 3-5 bikes. Needing a new name to distinguish his new bike from a Motocruiser, he chose Yeti, named after a sleeping bag he liked. This is the first bike he sold under the Yeti name from the storefront window of Emily K’s bicycle clothing store in Santa Barbara, CA. It was purchased by a young woman who owned it until just a couple years ago when a chance encounter with John at a motorcycle show reunited the bike with its maker.

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Flashes of the Altai

Nothing like a multi-modal expedition through the Mongolian backcountry to make you feel particularly small…

“Three childhood friends set out for the far western corner of Mongolia to combine mountain biking and packrafting in a self-supported adventure into the unknown. Never having attempted a mountain bike to packraft link-up, they decided it was a great idea to travel to one of the most remote and sparsely populated places in the world to try it out.”

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Yeti in the Southwest

The Yeti is a beast that has long been a myth in the Himalayan mountains, yet here, the Yeti appears to be right at home in the desert. Check out more to this story, including some amazing photos at Yeti Cycles.

Johnny O’ Mara’s Yeti ARC

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Johnny O’ Mara’s Yeti ARC

This bike has a rich history and for vintage MTB collectors like Martin of Second Spin Cycles, it was a must-have for his extensive catalog. You see, Martin is a curator of sorts. Up until recently, he was commissioned by other collectors and hobbyists to build their dream bike. Whether it was a Yeti or a Yo Eddy, Martin had a knack for finding even the rarest components or accessories to top off a vintage build. Now Martin’s life is too busy to spend time for other people and has began focusing on his own bikes, which he actually rides quite frequently, whereas most collectors just display.

Now, back to this special Yeti ARC. A little while ago this frame popped up on eBay. It had a Johnny O’Mara decal on the toptube, signature hand-machined cable ferrels, FTW welds and a serial tag of number 90. All the signs pointed to this being an actual Johnny O’Mara bike, but there was one thing that threw Martin off: the bike was in Germany. The vintage MTB world is a strange one. Collectors scour the internet all over and if someone really wants a bike, they’ll pay top dollar for it. That said, Martin wasn’t too surprised to see the frame overseas. Who knows, maybe the owner was a Johnny fan?

After acquiring it, he began looking at some of O’Mara’s signature build details. With this particular pedigree of Yeti, Johnny was known to mis-match the hubs and cantilever brakes. So Martin did just that. One black Shimano XT hub on the front, one silver Shimano XT hub on the rear. He also had a penchant for purple, so on went the ever-so-classy Cook Brothers cranks, ODI grips and Ringlé skewers. Onza tires and a Manitou fork finished off the build, resulting in one pristine Yeti ARC. So pristine that the heads at Yeti want this bike for their home office, which is where it’s heading next week…

Martin was kind enough to bring this bike to the Cub House in South Pasadena yesterday for me to photograph and if vintage MTBs are you thing, I’d suggest giving him a follow at @SecondSpin.

Lookin’ Good, Yeti

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Lookin’ Good, Yeti

30 years is a long time in this industry and to commemorate three decades of shredding, Yeti designed a limited edition SB6c trail bike. This is one of the best looking, modern mountain bikes I’ve seen in a very long time. A little throwback goes a long ways. 30 years to be exact.

The Limited Edition 30th SB6c is available now at your local Yeti dealer.

Yeti Launches the SB5c BETI and a ASRc BETI for Female Riders

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Yeti Launches the SB5c BETI and a ASRc BETI for Female Riders

Julie Furtado, Marla Streb, Tara Llanes, Jill Kitner, and Rosara Joseph. All of these women have ridden Yeti in the past when both the brand itself and the industry was younger. As technology changed, the bikes became more advanced and fit became even more of an importance. Enter the Yeti BETI line. Two bikes, a SB5c and an ASRc, both designed with a female fit in mine. Both are derivatives of the existing models, but built with different sized wheels to accommodate smaller riders. It’s great to see options out there for women in mountain biking. Head over to Yeti to see more on the SB5c BETI and ASRc BETI.