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Radar

Seeking New Frontiers with Wahoo and Ian Boswell

After a successful career racing the European pro circuit on teams including Trek-Livestrong, Team Sky, and Katusha-Alpecin, American pro cyclist Ian Boswell has decided to transition from the road calendar to a new challenge — racing for Wahoo Fitness on a circuit of his own design that will include gravel and endurance mountain bike events. Boswell will be chronicling his move from road to gravel racing in Wahoo’s new ​Frontiers campaign​ that will include podcasts and video episodes.

Flemish Hospitality: CX Style

Reportage

Flemish Hospitality: CX Style

I was hardly surprised when he turned us away. After three seasons battling these neon-vested, parking fascists at Belgian cyclocross races, I’d come to expect rejection.

Max and I were racing today, and we’d just tried to enter the Renner’s Parking, the exact place for people like us. Yet the gatekeeper grunted in Flemish that there was no room for our little Peugeot Partner in the lot stuffed with hundreds of camper vans and buses from the larger Belgian teams.

Radar

Is it a Hardtail or a Full Suspension? The TREK Supercaliber

Let’s face it, there’s not a lot of head-turning tech coming from the world of frame design within the MTB industry. Longer, slacker, lower, new linkages, electronic shifting. We’ve seen that all coming from a mile away but the latest from TREK has my interest piqued. Especially for bikepacking or other long endurance rides where you don’t want to deal with a lot of bobbing from a long travel rear linkage. The Supercaliber does look fun! As for the video, kudos, team Trek.

Tro Bro Leon is Its Own Unique Race

Reportage

Tro Bro Leon is Its Own Unique Race

Tro Bro Leon is Its Own Unique Race
Photos and words by Ethan Glading

Don’t call it “the Paris-Roubaix of the west.” Or “Paris-Roubaix on dirt.” Don’t call it “the Paris-Roubaix x” of anything. Tro Bro Leon is its own unique race with a character and charm you won’t find at any other event.

Held in late April in far western Brittany, the race covers 205 kms of the beautiful Bretagne countryside, including 27 sectors of ribinou, narrow dirt roads that wind through woods, farmers’ fields, over hills, along the sea and even through tunnels. The weather is typically Breton: the riders face rain, dust, mud, sunshine and strong winds from all directions in the course of the race.