#FOX

tag

Four Months of Riding Shimano’s 12-Speed Deore M6100: “the People’s Champ”

Reportage

Four Months of Riding Shimano’s 12-Speed Deore M6100: “the People’s Champ”

The constant evolution of mountain bike technology over the past few years has been relentless. Mixed in with the breakneck progression comes fierce competition between the two powerhouses of component manufacturing; SRAM and Shimano. While Shimano was arguably a bit late to the 1x game when compared to SRAM’s early adoption of this technology, over the past few years they’ve proven they’re taking it seriously and have completely revamped one of their most beloved groups, Deore with trickle-down tech normally only found on the higher-priced tiers. I’ve been riding the entire M6100 kit for the past four months here in Santa Fe on my Mystic hardtail and I’m ready to talk about it, so let’s drop right in…

More than a Throwback: the Yeti ARC 29er Hardtail

Reportage

More than a Throwback: the Yeti ARC 29er Hardtail

We’re big into hardtails here at the Radavist. While my personal bikes are all steel, riding carbon bikes can be a real treat, especially when the company has put so much thought into the design.

Yeti has a long history of designing capable and attractive bikes. The original ARC was a collaboration with Easton and the intent was to make a truly lightweight machine in that era. The OG ARC’s aluminum frameset weighed a mere 3.2lbs, which was a groundbreaking accomplishment for 1991 and those bikes are still iconic, even today.

You could say Yeti had a lot riding on this new ARC design and there were a few decisions that set this new model on a different trajectory from its predecessor. After riding this bike for a month here in Santa Fe, I’ve finally wrapped my head around how to review it, pointing out its accomplishments and my own personal critiques of this entirely new model, so read on for more…

Limited to 100 Units: Yeti Cycles Announces the ARC 35th Anniversary Edition 29er Hardtail

Radar

Limited to 100 Units: Yeti Cycles Announces the ARC 35th Anniversary Edition 29er Hardtail

Brands like Yeti have a rich history to reference and what better time than their 35th anniversary to announce a limited-edition ARC hardtail. Looking back to 1991, the ARC was a collaboration with Yeti and Easton to produce a lightweight race frame. During that time, frames were steel and weighed up to 6lbs. This collaboration resulted in a 3.2lb frameset, making it a dominating factor in races of all classes.

35 years later, this stunning throwback is announced but in a more modern material. These beautiful 29ers are limited to 100 units, in sizes SM-XL, and come built with tons of limited edition turquoise components. Check out all the details below.

Monkey Wrenching with the Esker Cycles Hayduke Hardtail in Arizona

Reportage

Monkey Wrenching with the Esker Cycles Hayduke Hardtail in Arizona

Back in 2016, at the end of the #dflthedivide trip, there was a great little 40th-anniversary party at FreeCycles in Missoula to celebrate Adventure Cycling turning 40. At this party, there was a real nifty bikepacking rig from a small company that was right at home in a nonprofit shop. The Advocate Cycles Hayduke. Now, Advocate has transformed into Esker Cycles, and though the road and touring frames are no more, Hayduke Lives! (on). These are my impressions of this nifty hardtail.

Fox Announces Newly Designed Forks and Heritage Collection

Radar

Fox Announces Newly Designed Forks and Heritage Collection

With Fox’s announcement of their newly designed forks this morning, they also rang the dinner bell to feast upon these limited edition Heritage Collection forks. Rootbeer, Pistachio, and Battleship are the colors adorning the 36, 38, and 40 forks. These forks are only available in limited quantities and will most likely sell out today, so holler at your local dealer to order one.

For those looking for 32 and 34 news, the step-cast Float 32 received a new crown, but the 34 comes in a step-cast lightweight trail 34 and a 34 trail. The 34 trail seems to be the sweet spot for hardtail and bikepacking rigs, as it now features FIT4 or FIT GRIP dampers, with 130, 140, 150mm of travel options.

Check out this massive product drop at Fox.

Radar

Fox Enters the Race Towards Safer Helmets with the Rampage Pro Carbon

The world of Rampage is something I don’t think is possible to fully understand until you see what those athletes are willing to do in person. Drops, gaps, and jumps that us mere mortals would never attempt, yet these athletes charge them with such confidence that we lose the ability to comprehend what exactly they’re doing. That world has many demands on the riders and Fox is looking to make one aspect even safer with their Rampage Pro Carbon helmet, which uses fluid technologies and carbon structures to ensure crashes become safer.

While I don’t intend of hitting 30′ hips or 100′ gaps, I can say this product looks intriguing, yet with so many helmet systems out there, it begs the question, is this race towards safer helmets just marketing, or is there something else there?

See more at Fox.

Team Dream GTFO to Oakley’s HQ – Sean Talkington

Reportage

Team Dream GTFO to Oakley’s HQ – Sean Talkington

Team Dream GTFO to Oakley’s HQ
Words and photos by Sean Talkington

Just about a year ago we brought over a French intern named Thibault to work with us here at Team Dream. Thibault (or Tebow as America now refers to him) had been working at Mavic during my first trip to the Tour de France and was sent out numerous times to pick us up in a van when the Peugeot 574 would break down. After some long hours stranded on the French roadside with Tebow, we became friends, and one night after a few glasses of rosé I offered him a job with us at Team Dream here in Los Angeles. To be honest I had no idea how crazy it is to obtain a work visa for a foreigner but after a lot of paperwork and a few site inspections at The Cub House we finally got Tebow to Los Angeles!

Sycip Designs, Shimano and ENVE Created Trans Cascadia Trail Work Rigs

Reportage

Sycip Designs, Shimano and ENVE Created Trans Cascadia Trail Work Rigs

Trail work is tough and that is a massive understatement. For the crew that runs Trans Cascadia each year, it means loading up chainsaws, fuel, and other tools, usually on their back, as they pedal into the great unknown that is the wild Oregon backcountry. Usually, the singletrack is overgrown, with felled trees, and other obstacles the crew needs to clear. In years past, the team has utilized motos when possible, but they can be large and cumbersome, so this year, the team at Trans Cascadia worked with Jeremy at Sycip Designs to make something extra special, just in time for Sea Otter…

2017 NAHBS: Alchemy Kratos with the Fox AX 40mm Suspension Fork

Reportage

2017 NAHBS: Alchemy Kratos with the Fox AX 40mm Suspension Fork

Designed around a 700c wheel with 427 axle-to-crown measurement, the Fox AX fork adds 40mm of travel to your cyclocross or all-road bike. As you might have guessed, AX stands for “Adventure Cross” and the Alchemy Kratos is an ideal mate for this new piece of technology. With three water bottle cage mounts, clearance for either a 700x43mm tire or a 27.5″ equivalent, bolt-on frame bag provisions, and rack mounts the Kratos is meant to take on endurance dirt races, or a weekend bug-out ride.

While I personally like this throwback to Tomac, I can see the AX fork ruffling some feathers… What do you think?

Seven Months with the Santa Cruz Tallboy LTC 29’r with SRAM XX1

Reportage

Seven Months with the Santa Cruz Tallboy LTC 29’r with SRAM XX1

I love long-term reviews. “Here, take this bike, travel with it and shred it for around six months, then send it right back to us.” Pretty ideal, huh? Especially when there’s a no-strings-attached policy. If you like it, do a review, or don’t, no big deal. Just get out and ride it. For The Radavist, that’s how I like to do product reviews: honestly and with no commitments. The problem is, you’ve got to be really stoked on a bike to want to ride it a bunch, and then photograph it / write about it.

Reviewing bikes is something I don’t often do, partially because I rarely get the chance to ride anything else besides my own bikes but mostly because so few companies contact me to review their bikes. One of the companies that has embraced what I’m doing over here is Santa Cruz and I can’t complain. Great company, great bikes and as I said before, no strings attached.

When Santa Cruz offered to send me out a Tallboy LTC with SRAM’s new – at the time – XX1 groupet back in December, I obliged! Who wouldn’t? I traveled with it, raced it a few times and rode the shit out of it for half a year.

While the world of the $8,000 – $10,000 MTB is certainly saturated at this point, I’ve ridden a few of them and yet I keep wanting to come back to the Tallboy and its unique riding characteristics. The best way I can describe the way this bike rides is solid. There’s no “plastic feel” to the frame, no annoying resonance when you hit technical sections and when the bike tells you to go in a particular direction, it’s usually on point… What often requires honing are your own skills and your confidence on that bike in particular.