#Nitto

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Ride Farr: Supa-Moto Riser Bars

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Ride Farr: Supa-Moto Riser Bars

There is no shortage of bar choices out there but one manufacturer rules the list. NITTO makes some of the best bars in the world and for their latest release, Ride Farr worked with NITTO to make the Supa-Moto Riser Bars from 2014 alloy.

Inspired by Flat Tracker bikes and the current trend of Klunker and Cruiser builds.

-Retro styled riser handlebar with 32mm rise and wider center section
-Updated 31.8 bar diameter so can be used with modern MTB stems
-Reasonably wide at 780mm so can also be used on Trail and XCO style builds
-Some extra bend on the ends for more comfort – these are 16 degree sweep!
-Added center width allows space for bags and accessories
-Ideal for bikepacking / touring / trail use – they’re damn comfy for sure.
-Weight : 395g ( 780mm length uncut )

Pre-order price is $95 with delivery in December at Ride Farr.

Sim Works has a New “Half Moon Rack” Front Rack

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Sim Works has a New “Half Moon Rack” Front Rack

Sim Works is proud to release their newest collaboration with Nitto in Japan. It’s a front rack constructed of Chromoly – just like your favorite bike frame – called the Half Moon Rack. Like all of Sim Works’ designs, this new rack puts function first, yet is well designed, and constructed to last a lifetime.

The ‘Half Moon’ rack is a light-duty front rack with a half-moon as inspiration. It’s available in chrome and black. Retail is $230.

Specs:
Material: 9mm CrMo Steel Tube
Weight: ave.780g
Max Load: 12kg
Leg length: 332mm〜352mm
Color: Chrome Plated & Black
Made by Nitto in Japan

See more at Sim Works.

Sim Works: Froggy Seatpost

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Sim Works: Froggy Seatpost

Coinciding with last week’s Doppo MTB frameset is this new post from Japan-based Sim Works. Designed in conjunction with Nitto, this new classic post features a classic silhouette, which kinda looks like a frog if you view it in profile. These new stealth gray posts come in 300 and 350mm lengths, 27.2mm clamp, and 0 or 23mm offsets. They’re made in Japan by Nitto and are in stock now at Sim Works USA for $120.

Color: Stealth gray
Post length: 300mm & 350mm
Material: Forged aluminum alloy
Outer diameter: φ27.2mm
Offset: 0mm & 23mm
Weight: 267g
*Carbon rails are not supported.

Ride Farr and Nitto: SUPA-WIDE GRVL Alloy Handlebars

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Ride Farr and Nitto: SUPA-WIDE GRVL Alloy Handlebars

Just as mountain bikes experienced a widening of their bars from the 1990’s 580mm widths to the 2020’s 820mm widths, gravel bikes are too in the midst of a widening trend. Think about it, why should you have to ride the same width bars on your rim brake road bike and your gravel bike. Both bikes operate under different conditions. While many are hesitant and there is a lot to consider with this conversation, a lot of people have caught onto this ergonomic trend. Ride Farr recently worked with Nitto to make a new drop bar, the SUPA-WIDE GRVL in three sizes. These bars will be in their stock in May, so stay tuned.

Specs:
-Heat-Treated Alloy
-Available in 3 Sizes – 650 / 700 / 750mm
-31.8mm Bar Diameter
-120mm Drop
-65mm Reach
-20 Degree Flare

Reference Weights:
-Medium ( 650 ) – 385g
-Large ( 700 ) – 400g
-X-Large ( 750 ) – 415g

Width Without the Waves: A Few Rides in on the 560mm Wide Crust x Nitto Shaka Bar

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Width Without the Waves: A Few Rides in on the 560mm Wide Crust x Nitto Shaka Bar

Crust Bikes gives the people what they want and that ranges from frames, to complete bikes, accessories, parts, and yeah, handlebars. Their small-time operation allows them to pivot easily to follow trends and in a lot of ways, set the trends themselves. With road bikes permuting into even more capable off-road machines, a lot of the ideologies of mountain bike design and technology have found its way onto drop-bar bicycles. Sure, the obvious moves are those shorter-travel suspension forks but something that not many people have touched on is bar width.

That’s where Crust Bikes and Ultra Romance have really influenced and inspired the question: what is the appropriate width for a drop-bar bicycle? We already looked at my Sklar with the Towel Rack Bars but after much demand – and my own curiosity – I decided to try out the Made in Japan by Nitto Shaka Bar.

Nitto for Crust Bikes: 560mm Shaka Bar

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Nitto for Crust Bikes: 560mm Shaka Bar

For those not wanting to go into the full commitment into the even large at size small 615mm Towel Rack bars, Crust Bikes worked with Nitto to manufacture a 560mm wide Shaka Bar. There are a few more differentiators, too. Including bar clamp. Shaka Bars are 31.8mm, Towel Rack bars are 26.0 and can be shimmed. The shape of the Shaka Bar is more traditional as well. Got any questions? Head to Crust to see more information and to sign up for an alert when these are in stock!

Jonny’s Azuki Pro with Joe Bell Paint is Ready for Eroica California

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Jonny’s Azuki Pro with Joe Bell Paint is Ready for Eroica California

When Jonny first rolled through the doors at Golden Saddle on this bike, I honed in on it. There was something familiar about the bike, yet I had never heard of the brand painted on the downtube. For some reason, it reminded me of an Eisentraut, or a Sachs. After talking to Jonny, he told me he works for Joe Bell, a literal living legend in the framebuilding world. Joe Bell, or JB as Jonny calls him, paints and has painted the frames of some of the most outstanding builders over the years.

Trying out the Sycip JJJBars on my 44 Bikes Ute Tourer

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Trying out the Sycip JJJBars on my 44 Bikes Ute Tourer

Bicycles. They’re a work in progress, especially ones that are derivative of a particular activity which in itself is evolving. Take bikepacking and touring for example. It seems just about every month, a company makes a new product which therein makes the act of touring eaiser or at least more enjoyable. When I first began talks with Kris Henry of 44 Bikes for this rigid mountain tourer, which I’ve come to call my “Ute” – an Aussie term, short for a utility vehicle – I had a vision for what touring meant and means to me. Leaving pavement and accessing trail, both in double and single track variety, means a fully loaded bike needs to be stable, comfortable and still maneuverable. Since this bikes inception, I’ve been sold on the Jones Bar, mostly due to the amazing leverage, riding position and varying riding positions. The thing, however, that didn’t work so well for me was the very thing that makes the Jones so unique: the hoop design and lack of rise. Also, the Jones bar has proven to be problematic with bikepacking and touring bags, which was slightly evident on my Death Valley tour. That Fabio’s Chest wanted to sag a bit too much with that setup.

Check out more below.

The SimWorks Potluck Rack

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The SimWorks Potluck Rack

Made from Chromoly by Nitto and available in two finishes: black or chrome, the SimWorks Potluck rack has everything you need in a touring or commuting rack. The large platform was designed with summer BBQs or potluck dinners in mind, specifically sized to hold a platter, a six pack of beer or to have a large Wald basket zip-tied to. Or you can use the rack for touring, with enough platform space to secure a randonneur bag and low-rider mounts for panniers.

This is hands down my favorite item I brought back from Japan and I can’t wait to install it on my touring bike. You can order one now through SimWorks USA but do so fast, these aren’t going to be in stock for long!

Compass Cycle Introduces a New Chromoly Rack

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Compass Cycle Introduces a New Chromoly Rack

Finding a strong, lightweight, chromoly rack ain’t easy. Especially one that has the light mount on the correct (for US riders) side. That’s why Compass went straight to the source: Japan’s Nitto to fabricate their new rack. It’s got a 22lb carrying capacity, comes in at 167g and yes, has the light mount on the road side, not the shoulder side.

See more at Compass and read up on the rack at the BQ journal.

Compass Randonneur Handlebars

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Compass Randonneur Handlebars

After vigorous testing, a full run at PBP and seeking out Japan’s Nitto for production, the Compass Randonneur handlebars are now available. These Extralight bars are light. More light than any of Nitto’s current offerings, yet strong enough to take on fire roads, cobbles or whatever you can throw at them. They are available in widths of 400, 420, 440 mm and are in stock now at Compass.

Blue Lug: MCR65 Stem and RM-3 Dirt Drop

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Blue Lug: MCR65 Stem and RM-3 Dirt Drop

Nitto’s newest offerings are now in stock at Blue Lug in Japan. The MCR65 Stem and RM-3 Dirt Drop are for 1 1/8″ bikes looking to be run with a high position dirt drop but in a classic design. These new shapes are available in black or silver and as evident in the photo above, add a different feel to a bike like the Surly Crosscheck.

Sycip’s New JJ Bars and JB Bars are Made by Nitto

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Sycip’s New JJ Bars and JB Bars are Made by Nitto

Nitto has been making handlebars for a very long time. To give you some perspective, back in the ’80s, there were dozens of handlebar manufacturers, then Taiwanese factories shut down all but one: Nitto.

Over the past few years, the Japanese handlebar manufacturer has lent American framebuilders a hand. Sycip cycles, being one of the more recent ones.

Now in stock, at Sycip’s online shop are the heat-treated aluminum JJ Bars and the CroMo steel JB bars. Both come in black or silver and are in stock now at Sycip.

Allan’s Hunqapillar Dirt Tourer

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Allan’s Hunqapillar Dirt Tourer

The Hunqapillar. A touring bike with massive clearances for mountain bike tires, tubing spec’d for off-road ripping (fully loaded) and a gorgeous green and cream paint job. Branded as a “Wooly Mammoth Bicycle”, this machine is meant to rip wakki 1-trakk and still make it to Poppi’s Pizza in time for a cold pint or a toke from the wizard’s pipe.

Golden Saddle Rides: 2003 Nagasawa Road with Campagnolo

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Golden Saddle Rides: 2003 Nagasawa Road with Campagnolo

When I launched the Radavist, one intention was to give some of my best friends a platform to share their photography. Kyle Kelley is an exceptional photographer and his bike shop, Golden Saddle Cyclery, needs no introduction here. A lot of insane rides come through the shop and I miss out on photographing them. I had an idea… and passed it off to Kyle.

Golden Saddle Rides is a series, showcasing the many bikes that roll through the doors of the shop, beginning with this early 2000’s Nagasawa road. Coincidentally, this bike is FOR SALE and will be at the Super Swap Portland at the GSC booth…