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OPEN’s New WI.DE is Their Rowdiest Bike Yet

With bigger clearance for a 27.5 x 2.4″ tire, fender mounts, double dropped chainstays, an updated geometry, and more, the new OPEN WI.DE is the rowdiest bike in their lineup. Check out this video as Gerard Vroomen and Andy Kessler take on the ripping trails around Basel, Switzerland.

My Manzanita Sklar 27.5 All Road Is Meaner Now with Crust Towel Rack Bars

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My Manzanita Sklar 27.5 All Road Is Meaner Now with Crust Towel Rack Bars

This bike. This freaking bike. When I first built up my Sklar, it was built on the 700c wheel platform. At Lost & Found last year, I swapped out the i9 wheels for the new ENVE G27 650b gravel wheels and haven’t missed the 700c wheels one bit. From there, the bike slowly went under transformations but it wasn’t until I put the Crust Towel Rack Bars on it that I feel like this bike has finally come into its own.

Standert’s Erdgeschoss Stainless All Road

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Standert’s Erdgeschoss Stainless All Road

When you ride offroad, be it gravel, wet roots, or race in mud, and carry loads, steel… stainless steel, is a great material for a frame that is the veritable Swiss Army Knife of bicycles. All road bikes can be used for so many activities and the 27.5 wheel platform offers a plush ride on 47mm tires, offering more traction and a more shreddy feel. Standert’s Erdgeschoss is the newest member to their stout catalog and is exactly that, an all road built around the 27.5 wheel platform. See more at Standert.

Builders for Builders Returns This Year! Buy a Raffle Ticket for a Chance to Win!

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Builders for Builders Returns This Year! Buy a Raffle Ticket for a Chance to Win!

Remember last year’s Builders for Builders fundraiser that launched at Lost & Found? Well, it’s back! With more builders this time. Stinner FrameworksSklar BikesMosaic CyclesMcGovern Cycles and Argonaut are all building Beautiful Bicycles to be raffled off to raise money for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Each of these bikes are stunning and are one of a kind, so head over to Sierra Trails to buy a raffle ticket and be on the lookout next week for photos of all the bikes to drop here on the Radavist.

René Herse: Juniper Ridge All Road Tire Now Comes with an Endurance Casing

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René Herse: Juniper Ridge All Road Tire Now Comes with an Endurance Casing

Without sacrificing the feel of René Herse tires’ supple casing, the team has developed endurance casings for many of their offerings, including the popular Juniper Ridge model. This casing, along with the new Hurricane Ridge 700x42mm Endurance Plus tire – a tire used by Ted King during the Dirty Kanza, round out a very plump tire lineup for the brand, including 700C x 38 mm Steilacoom Endurance, 700C x 42 mm Hurricane Ridge Standard, 700C x 42 mm Hurricane Ridge Extralight, 700C x 42 mm Hurricane Ridge Endurance, 700C x 42 mm Hurricane Ridge Endurance Plus, 650B x 48 mm Juniper Ridge Endurance. See more at René Herse.

The New Santa Cruz Stigmata Got Chubbier… and Lighter

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The New Santa Cruz Stigmata Got Chubbier… and Lighter

Last week, we looked at the new Juliana Quincy, through the eyes and words of Amy Jurries and today, I’ll be taking you through the new Stigmata, as someone who rallied and loved the last model. How does it compare? Read on below.

The Santa Cruz Stigmata was truly one of the first disc all-road bikes that opened my eyes to not only what an off-road bike could be, but what it should be. I loved it so much that it influenced the geometry of my Firefly, yet that initial Stigmata review was over four years ago. A lot has changed in that time and the Stiggy was long overdue for an overhaul, mainly in one specific area, the tire clearance!

Meet the New Quincy: Juliana’s Answer to the Popular Santa Cruz Stigmata

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Meet the New Quincy: Juliana’s Answer to the Popular Santa Cruz Stigmata

First Impressions: Meet the New Quincy – Juliana’s Answer to the Popular Stigmata.
Words by Amy Jurries, riding photos by Ian Collins, and bike photos by John Watson

Quincy, California sits at the northern end of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. It’s in the heart of California’s Gold Country where in the mid-1800s, miners from all over the world came for their chance at striking it rich. It’s in part thanks to the Gold Rush that within spitting distance of town, you have access to hundreds of miles of mountainous dirt roads.

While the town itself is small, with not much more than a movie theater and a few places to shop, each year around September the population swells with the crazy two-wheeled set for Grinduro weekend. Juliana’s new drop bar bike, the Quincy, is 100-percent made to rule on this terrain. Before Sea Otter, I was invited down to hang out with the Juliana/Santa Cruz team and test out the Quincy. With a 40+ mile ride in the mountains around Big Basin Redwoods State Park, we rode hard on everything from tarmac connectors and loose chalky gravel to branches, mud, and gopher-hole-checkered grassy downhills.

Brent’s Fat Chance Chris Cross Makes Him Jump, Jump

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Brent’s Fat Chance Chris Cross Makes Him Jump, Jump

It’s hard not to make that reference on a bike called the Chris Cross. Back when Fat Chance began, I doubt Chris Chance would have foreseen the future, or at least where and how people would be riding these bikes that are a mix of ‘cross and road bikes yet here we are. Brent bought a Chris Cross with the “Team Fade” finish and matching stem to be his all-rounder bike in SoCal and on a recent outing to Los Angeles, I was able to shoot this damn perfect bike.

Thesis Bike OB1

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Thesis Bike OB1

Thesis Bikes offer their flagship frame, the OB1, direct to consumer in a variety of build kits. From pavement, to dirt roads, and bikepacking, the Thesis website has various options to get your OB1 frame dialed in for your preferred use. If you’re not looking for a new setup just yet, they also make wheels, and new hollow-forged cranks. Head to Thesis Bike’s website to see the build kit options, starting at $3,299 for a complete.

Have you seen the OB1 in person? What do you think of this platform? I saw one at Sea Otter and it looked great!

Sea Otter Classic 2019: OD Green Chapter2 AO with Fulcrum Rapid Red Wheels

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Sea Otter Classic 2019: OD Green Chapter2 AO with Fulcrum Rapid Red Wheels

Can you OD from OD green? I can’t and at the 2019 Sea Otter Classic, there was a lot of olive drab green bikes, one of which I wanted to spend a little more time documenting because it was from two brands taking on the all-road market. Chapter2 is based out of New Zealand, spearheaded by Mike Pryde. They pride themselves in many of the roadie mantras with “light, fast, responsive” in their tagline, yet the Chapter2 AO looks to add a couple more to that list. If I were to expand on the light, fast, responsive, line, I’d add in versatility and compatibility to that list.

Sea Otter Classic 2019: Niner Bikes’ MCR 9 RDO Prototype Full Suspension All Road

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Sea Otter Classic 2019: Niner Bikes’ MCR 9 RDO Prototype Full Suspension All Road

Whoa whoa whoa. What? Last year we saw a plastic shelled prototype of Niner’s full suspension all road, the MCR 9 RDO, and this year at Sea Otter, the brand teased an updated prototype, to the shock and awe of trail shredders and roadies alike.

Niner calls the MCR 9 RDO their Magic Carpet Ride, alluding to the cushy feel that full suspension offers all-day gravel racers. Their theory is the suspension allows riders to run their tires at higher pressures, avoiding snakebite tire tears, rim damage, and less rolling resistance, all with 50mm x 27.5 clearance. Their CVA design – constant varying arc – boasts modified leverage ratios for less travel and total lockout maximizes energy on pavement climbs. The frame is made from Niner’s RDO carbon layup, with one piece forged linkages, has a removable front derailleur mounts and has full sleeve internal routing.

While this bike might not be for everyone, it is cool to see. If you’re feeling this design, let Niner know in the comments and be on the lookout for the MCR 9 RDO late 2019.

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Follow Niner on Instagram and follow Rebecca Rusch on Instagram.

Otso Releases the Waheela All Road

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Otso Releases the Waheela All Road

Wolf Tooth’s frame company Otso has carved a niche in the market by offering functional bikes with plenty of versatility built in. That ideology is embodied in their newest frame, the Waheela all road. While marketed as a ‘gravel race’ bike, there’s nothing keeping this bike from being a quiver killer, even for those who don’t race. Bikepack on it, use it as your road bike, and much more. With a tuning chip, massive tire clearance, 1x or 2x compatibility, there’s not much the Waheela can’t tackle. See more information at Otso and more photos below.

Imperfect Asphalt: Riding the New Salsa Warroad in Los Angeles

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Imperfect Asphalt: Riding the New Salsa Warroad in Los Angeles

Salsa hasn’t had a true road bike in their lineup for some time now. Sure, they have the Warbird, which is a gravel racing road bike, but with that, comes a more stable geometry with a longer wheelbase. The Warroad is a straight up endurance road bike, with two wheel sizes and multiple build kit options. Warroad is a new platform for Salsa, designed to take on chunky, imperfect asphalt, with what Salsa is calling their “Endurance Road Geometry.”

NAHBS 2019: Boosted Black Cat All Road – Most Practical Innovation Award

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NAHBS 2019: Boosted Black Cat All Road – Most Practical Innovation Award

Big tires, short chainstays, double crankset, pick two. Normally. Then there’s the concept of a boost road bike, in which case, pick all three. I call it a concept because there’s a lot that has to go into making a boost road bike a reality. To go from 142mm rear spacing to 148mm rear you’ve got to move things outboard a bit. I’ve seen a number of cobbled together solutions for this, which usually revolve around adopting a complete MTB drivetrain from the bottom bracket spindle, to the cranks, cassette, and chainline. But what about a road bike? Or a chubby road bike? That’s where it gets interesting.

A First Look at Thomson’s New Titanium All Road Bike and New Titanium Seatpost

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A First Look at Thomson’s New Titanium All Road Bike and New Titanium Seatpost

Perhaps you recall Thomson making bikes with Lynskey a few years back? Those US made frames were a unique move for the component manufacturer and even though they didn’t sell a ton of the collaboration bikes, it set a precedent for the brand, prompting this project. Yesterday, I met Mike from Thomson, who was in town en route to NAHBS in Sacramento. Mike was unpacking and building up this flashy titanium bike when I saw the Thomson logo on the downtube. While it looks like a polished, finished product, this frame is, in fact, a working prototype. Not the first Thomson bike, but one of the first bikes Thomson has developed to be made overseas in Taiwan.