Category Archives: Shop Visit
Rock Lobster
My favorite photo from the set. That's the first Rock Lobster!

Paul Sadoff is a character. His personality has a patina. One that’s formed over years of racing pedigree and loud music. The name of his company was derived by the B-52′s billboard hit but before Paul would name his brand Rock Lobster, he had to have built a MTB first. “I couldn’t call it Rock Lobster if I didn’t have a MTB” Paul said when asked about the origins of his namesake… Then he built a MTB and the world changed for the frame builder.

The logo was even derived from MTB riding. Those blocks holding the letters represent rubble falling down the trail as you’re riding…

His frames have always been some of my favorite in the industry. These no-nonsense bikes are straight-forward, tig-welded masterpieces. Yes, utilitarian art – I’m standing by that phrase. Paul builds each frame in an industrial building within the Santa Cruz city limits. His own space is literally littered with cycling memorabilia from the past twenty years (even longer?) and is a gold mine of interestingness.

From track to TT, each of Sadoff’s frames bear some uniqueness and have a story to tell. Even the various crash-replacements…

While I was in town for the Giro #SantaCruzEffect, our group of 10 journalists swung through Rock Lobster to see Paul and his space. It was probably one of the most rushed Shop Visits I’ve done to date, but I managed to gain some understanding as to how Paul works and what makes Rock Lobster tick… Check out a narrated Gallery for more!

Apr 11, 2014 2 comments
Peacock Groove
Peacock GROOOOOVE!

Erik Noren. There can be only one. This man makes me laugh more than anyone else at NAHBS. Every year, the man behind Peacock Groove outdoes himself and wows the crowd with his tribute bikes. Some are Voltron-themed, others pay homage to the Evil Dead, while others are just so damn rad! Peacock Groove is unlike any other frame company I know of…

While I expected to see Erik in the throes of production for NAHBS, I didn’t expect to see his long-time side project “The Plus System” underway. While I won’t go into too much detail on what the Plus System is, I will say it’s a line of in-house designed and manufactured headsets, available with a Peacock Groove frame. There’s more to come on that – at NAHBS, for now, let’s look at some photos from Erik’s well kempt work space.

Mar 6, 2014 4 comments
Speaking of A-train Cycles
A-Train-4

While we were visiting Peacock Groove in Minneapolis, I popped over to see Alex at A-train‘s space, which is on the same floor as Peacock and other builders. While he wasn’t working on an A-train frameset (he was retrofitting a road bike with belt drive rockers), I got to check out his space and shoot a few photos. It’s not much, but hopefully next time I’ll get to photograph Alex working on some of his wonderful brazing.

Check out a few more below.

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Mar 5, 2014 1 comment
Foes Racing – Handmade in Pasadena Aluminum MTB Frames
... and Brent gets to work.

Brent Foes is no stranger to metal fabrication. He began working in the automotive industry, designing trucks and other off-road vehicles for brands like Ford and Nissan before he opened Foes Racing in 1993.

Since then, Brent’s been pursuing the perfection of the long travel system (LTS) mountain bike at his shop in Pasadena, California, where, over the year’s he’s had race machines under some of the fastest pros in the world.

His bikes are no-nonsense trail machines. Most of the work is done on-site and Brent welds each frame himself. At Interbike last year, Foes unveiled a 27.5 XC machine that weighed 23lbs complete. That’s light for a full sus MTB, much less one that’s made in the USA.

Last week, I had the opportunity to tour the Foes facility before picking up a bike to demo, meet Brent briefly and see the man at work. It was an incredible experience and one that I’ll outline in the Gallery!

If you’re in the market for something different, contact FOES for your next build!

Feb 19, 2014 2 comments
My Mountain Melbourne
Shop Visit: My Mountain Melbourne

Man, I haven’t done a Shop Visit in some time. Thinking back at a few local bike shops I’ve been to in the past few months, two of my favorites were MTB shops. One of which was Topanga Creek Bicycles (which FYXO shot some great photos of) – I didn’t have my cameras and another, very different shop was My Mountain Melbourne.

As someone who’s recently rediscovered his love for XC and trail ripping, My Mountain was an all-you-can-eat buffet of radness. Well, as long as your wallet has enough clout. The owner, Tim, is not messing around. It was his Yeti SB95c that I was riding and that’s just the tip of the iceberg for the kinds of builds leaving his shop.

Tallboy LTC with full ENVE? Sure thing. Coming right up. Trek ProjectOne SuperFly with XX-1? You got it.

The world of high-end MTBs is just out of most of our grasps, but that’s not what makes a shop rad. My Mountain sponsors local racers, events and has an extensive demo fleet. They’re a new shop, so infill is coming in slowly, but right now, it looks like there’s a lot of potential in this space.

Check out more in the Gallery!

Nov 11, 2013 3 comments
One on One Minneapolis
Shop Visit: One on One Minneapolis

To visit Gene and the crew at One on One is to visit a mountain bike museum of sorts. Gene used to race for Bridgestone back in the 80′s. His many bikes line the walls and ceilings of this mecca for dirt heads in the midwest and beyond. But One on One is much more than a MTB specific shop, it’s a cultural hub in Minneapolis, an icon of urban cycling and for many, a local bike shop. Add in a coffee shop and cycling memorabilia to the mix and you’re bound to spend some time walking up and down the space over and over again.

I spent a lot of time at One on One talking to Gene and Cars are Coffins-founder Hurl. Those two guys are some of the most sincere pedal-philes I’ve met. If you live in Minneapolis and haven’t been by, you should! If you’re nice, maybe Gene will let you into the basement. Don’t worry, it’s not that creepy…

While I was there, I shot a few photos in the shop, check them out in the Gallery!

Aug 26, 2013 5 comments
Brooklyn’s Rosko Cycles
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A visit to New York wouldn’t be complete without me bugging Seth Rosko for at least an afternoon. In the past, I’ve tried to document his workspace but have never been 100% satisfied with the outcome, until this visit. The thing about Seth’s workshop is that it’s most likely smaller than your bedroom…

His shop measures roughly a four meter cube, barely big enough for two grown men to move about, much less a Bridgeport, jigs, tubes, component boxes and bikes. Every time I come back to see Seth, the shop is more dialed in and this time, I am confident with the documentation.

Seth’s been working a lot of keeping up with his grassroots racing support. A lot of up and coming racers in NYC are riding his steel bikes and that’s something he’s very passionate about. Cross, MTB, road, it doesn’t matter. If you pedal it fast in circles, he can build it.

Check out a few photos from my Shop Visit to Rosko Cycles in the Gallery!

Aug 13, 2013 10 comments
Cycles d’Autremont
Cycles_dAutremont-COVER-1

“Locals only” is a term made popular by surfers during the 60′s that still resonates today with some. When I was visiting Cycles d’Autremont in Burlington, Vermont, the phrase took on a different meaning. Modern day framebuilders suffer from the effects of the internet age. It’s easy to click “contact”, write a note to a builder, kick the proverbial tires, make silly requests and inevitably, waste everyone’s time.

Or perhaps the client does put down a deposit. Depending on the person, the next few months could go one of a few ways. Hopefully, everyone leaves happy and life goes on. Most builders rarely build for locals. Some send out fit documentation so the client can record his or her body measurements, or they get sent to a shop to record the data. For whatever the reason, your “local” builder might not be building all too many local frames.

That’s something Hubert d’Autremont dwells on frequently. It’s not easy finding the balance between steadily-building and incredibly-busy but one of the ways Hubert’s ensured a healthy and controlled queue is by only building locally. His clients have all been from Vermont and he’s met every one of them. In a way, his “locals only” mentality has kept his business in a controlled state of production. He’s happy, his clients are happy and best of all, he can still sneak in a ride.

My time at Cycles d’Autremont was limited, due to family obligations, but in the hour or so of chatting with Hubert, I really appreciated his approach to bicycle design and fabrication. He’s worked with some of the best builders on the east coast and is a favorite amongst many in the community. We already took a look at his own porteur, so now let’s take a in-depth look to his studio… Check out some narrated photos in the Gallery!

Aug 13, 2013 4 comments
Mission Workshop
Mission Workshop Signage

A lot has changed for Mission Workshop since I first visited their retail space and design offices over three years ago. In that time, their bag range has doubled and their technical apparel line is growing just as fast. All of Mission Workshop’s bags are and have always been made in the USA, something few companies can claim these days. Most of their apparel is made in California, with a select number of jackets are made in Vancouver.

Balancing this growth isn’t always easy but it’s working. What began as a small nook off an alleyway in the Mission has quickly expanded to a lego-like composition of shipping containers and there’s no sign of the crew slowing down with the addition of their Acre clothing line on the horizon. Check out some narrated photos in the Gallery.

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Jun 5, 2013 1 comment
Afternoon Cup at Flat Track Coffee
Afternoon Cup at Flat Track Coffee

I don’t need to write some clever dialoge about how people love their local coffee shops. Since moving to Austin, the coffee options have grown considerably and one of the first people I met in Austin who really got coffee was Matty B.

For the past few months, he and Sterling have been working on Flat Track Coffee. They went from delivering beans to businesses and selling to individuals directly, to opening a small shop in Austin’s East Side. It’s literally three blocks from my house and has become a post-ride staple, as well as an afternoon pick me up.

Follow these guys on Instagram for some rad bike photos and check out some photos I shot in the Gallery!

Flat Track Coffee
913 E Cesar Chavez
Austin, TX, 78702
Open daily…

Tools of the trade:
Leica M7
Zeiss T* f2.8 28mm
Fuji Neopan 400

May 16, 2013 4 comments