Category Archives: photography
Team Dream in Owens Valley

Team Dream’s new Spring collection is going live on their new website today at 12 PST. To coincided with this launch, I figured I’d share our photoshoot images here on the site!

Home to the Owens River, bounded by the Inyo Mountains on the east, the Coso Range on the southeast, Sierra Nevada on the west and Chalfant Valley on the north, Owens Valley is one of the most geologically diverse areas in California, in my opinion anyway. It’s a veritable playground for the outdoors with Mount Whitney, the highest point in the lower 48 States, attracting hikers from all over the world. If you’re not into climbing a 14,505′ mountain, the Owens river is great for fishing and there are numerous other activities found surrounding the towns of Lone Pine, Big Pine and Independence, California. (more…)

Apr 17, 2017 21 comments
Outside Magazine Takes on NAHBS


Photo by Jim Merithew

I love seeing non-cycling oriented or specific news sites covering an event like NAHBS. Jim from Outside Magazine has a great gallery up, including a behind the scenes look at me in the thick of documenting balleur bikes! Head on over to Outside to see more!

Mar 23, 2017 11 comments
Back from a Desert Reset

Each year after NAHBS, I like to take some time off the bike and explore the desert. This year, Cari and I packed up the truck and took Max out to the Mojave Preserve for an extended weekend of exploration and observation. With all the rain we’ve had, it was a veritable vegetation overload. The flora and fauna were out in full force and consequently, both of our trigger fingers were happy. A high point for both of us were seeing three adult desert tortoises and reporting them to the local rangers who are tracking this endangered species’ recovery.

Mar 20, 2017 16 comments
Gearing up for Life on the Bike: Camera and Tech – Ryan Wilson

Packing for an open-ended bike tour through remote areas of developing countries can be a bit intimidating. You don’t want to get there and realize you’re missing something crucial that you’re going to have trouble finding locally, but you don’t want to overpack and feel required to haul a bunch of stuff that you don’t really need.

With that in mind, I wanted to start a series of posts discussing my personal gear setup and some of the things I’ve learned in my first 7 months of living on the bike in South America. First up I’ll dive into my electronics setup and touch on the question I get asked most frequently… “what camera are you using?” (more…)

Feb 28, 2017 30 comments
Using Instagram Stories for a Photo Tutorial

I get a lot of emails, messages, and comments about shooting photos while riding bikes and over the next few weeks, I’ll be doing my best to address them using Instagram’s “Stories” format. Yesterday, I took to the Verdugo Mountains in LA County to share the process for shooting landscapes with a 90mm lens and a mirrorless camera. These stories are still live for another few hours on the Radavist Instagram, so check them out. Next up, I’ll be discussing the options for carrying a camera on the bike, which is part of a gallery I’m working on this week so tune in! Unfortunately, “stories” aren’t viewable on your desktop, so you’ll have to look on your mobile device.

Feb 20, 2017 9 comments
Touring the Rocky Mountain Front – Locke Hassett

Touring the Rocky Mountain Front
Photos and words by Locke Hassett

“Mel’s Diner, 9ish?” is the text I received from Cameron. The night before, he left in a frazzled state to go to the Rocky Mountain Front, and I followed the next morning. This vast expanse of abrupt cliffs where the Rockies meet the Great Plains spans much of North America, so I was glad that he specified a diner as a meeting place. We fueled up on strong coffee, plenty of biscuits and gravy, bought a map, two slingshots, whiskey, lemonade and a few cookies from the Augusta general store. A fine establishment that acts as the local liquor store, gun shop, grocery, outfitter and purveyor of homemade baked goods. (more…)

Feb 20, 2017 38 comments
Bill Cunningham in Three Objects

I’m so moved by this studio photo and that doesn’t happen all too often. Check out more at Hypebeast. If you don’t know who Bill Cunningham is, or was, rather, check out the documentary on Hulu. Thanks for sharing, Julian!

Feb 20, 2017 3 comments
Shredding and Gettin’ Steezy in St. Geezy on the Zen Trail

A few months back, the boys from Angry Catfish in Minneapolis invited Kyle from Golden Saddle Cyclery in Los Angeles to meet them in Utah for five days of riding mountain bikes in St. George – aka St. Geezy – and Hurricane – aka Herahkun. The only problem is, Kyle doesn’t have a car and he didn’t quite feel like pedaling all the way to Utah from Los Angeles on his singlespeed mountain bike. That’s where I came into the picture. I’ve got a car, with a bike rack and enough room to carry all our shit for a week. Now Kyle had a ride, I got to ride in Utah and everyone would get some sweet-ish photos out of the whole shindig. (more…)

Feb 7, 2017 26 comments
Testing Out the Sony A7rii During This Weekend’s Events

This goes without saying, but this website is as much about cycling as it is photography. There are countless times during every workday where I just want to go on a bike ride, but feel obligated to bring a camera along to document any kind of radness that might happen along the way. Thus, my biggest challenge I deal with day to day is problem-solving the balance between cycling and photography. For me, there are two modus operandi present: large and small-scale production. Whereas the large combines the use of a large DSLR and telephoto lenses or off-camera flashes and small relies on my rangefinder with primes, utilizing natural light. What I’ve found is the only deciding factor between the two is whether or not I feel like wearing a photo bag while I pedal around the city of Los Angeles and what kind of shooting I’ll be doing. (more…)

Jan 23, 2017 55 comments
A Sudden Shift of Seasons in the Peruvian Andes – Ryan Wilson

A Sudden Shift of Seasons in the Peruvian Andes
Photos and words by Ryan Wilson

Continued from “Taking the Scenic Route to Peru’s Great Divide

It happens without notice in the Andes. One day it’s mostly clear skies as far back as you can remember, then one good thunderstorm rolls in and with it seems to come the daily barrage of rain, hail, and snow. This marks the true beginning of the “shoulder season”, nestled in the southern hemisphere’s spring. For me, this timed out exactly on the first day of starting this section of the Peruvian Divide, following a quick re-supply detour to Lima*.

*As a side note regarding life in Peru… the majority of people here do not own cars. This is especially true in the quiet areas that are the most interesting for riding. As a result, many of the villages have small vans (called colectivos) coming and going at least once or twice per day toward the larger towns, and they’re typically only the equivalent of a few bucks even for a trip that lasts a few hours. This is quite helpful if you want to check out a bigger city that is a ways off-route and have a chance to pick up a few things that might be tough to come by in small villages. It’s also helpful if you’re running low on dinero and need to find an ATM, which can occasionally be tough to locate in remote areas. With the divide route intersecting the main road toward Lima, it was a perfect opportunity for a trip to the city. (more…)

Jan 23, 2017 18 comments