Category Archives: road bike
Kyle’s Fat Bottom Cosmic Stallion Road with Campagnolo Chorus 11

Kyle’s 650b Cosmic Stallion Road with Campagnolo Chorus 11
Photos by John Watson and words by Kyle Kelley

Editor’s intro. I love Kyle’s All-City Cosmic Stallion. For me, the interchangeability of these bikes from 700c to 650b open up a door for riders to experience the plush cush of a 47mm tubeless road tire on a readily-available, production frame. It’s my belief that these 650b / 27.5″ wheeled bikes will alter the “road” industry to a place that proves you don’t need 23mm tires and 110 PSI to enjoy “all the roads.”

A while back I found myself riding my road bike less and less and my cyclocross bike more and more. I just wanted to get further and further from the hustle and bustle of the big city and closer to the epicenter of the San Gabriel Mountains, but I also understood that I would always have at least 15 miles on pavement before reaching the service roads and single track found in the Angeles Forest. No matter how much riding I was doing in the mountains, I was guaranteed 30 miles on the actual road, and no matter how much dirt the middle of the ride promised, road geometry made the most sense for these longer rides.

Raise your hand if you have ridden an actual cyclocross bike over 100 miles in one sitting. It is not fun and I’m not talking about type 2 fun. A road bike just works better for on and off-road riding. Hence the gravel craze.

For me, it’s just a road bike, and that’s why it has road pedals. It’s ridden on roads, paved and dusty. It’s a road bike, and for me, no road bike should be built with anything but Campagnolo. Now, thanks to Paul Component Engineering and their Klampagnolo brakes, with a Campy-specific pull and Chorus‘ new, 32-tooth cassette, why would you use anything but Campy?

I know this build isn’t for everyone, but I guarantee it’s for way more of you disbelievers than you think. The bike rolls fast on the 47c slicks, doesn’t weigh much because of the carbon bits, and will go just about anywhere! Can’t argue with that, right? Well…of course, you can, and that’s OK because that’s your right to have an opinion. I’m just saying, someday give it a try and then let’s talk.

Fat bottomed bikes you make the ripping world go round!

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Follow Kyle on Instagram and follow Golden Saddle Cyclery on Instagram.

Jan 23, 2018 131 comments
FYXO: Black and Gold Speedvagen Road


Photo by Andy White

If you have an appetite for absurdly aesthetic cycling apparatus, do not miss this black and gold Speedvagen road, documented by FYXO.

Jan 21, 2018 Comments are OFF
The Col Collective: Cormet de Roselend via Col du Pré

Mike Cotty and the Col Collective have been looking in detail at a few of the climbs from the 2018 Tour schedule, including Stage 11’s route from Albertville to La Rosière and featuring the Cormet de Roselend…

Jan 21, 2018 Comments are OFF
Saffron Frameworks: Danny’s Bridget Riley-Inspired Road Bike

These days, it’s almost impossible to keep up with the worldwide framebuilding community’s recent works, but sometimes a bike build comes across my radar and I have to promptly share it. The newest from Saffron Frameworks is Danny’s road bike. It was built from a mix of Columbus Spirit, HSS, and Life tubing, with a Futura fork that allows for a 28mm tire clearance.

While the bike’s stance is on-par with the excellence that comes from Saffron, the paint design is something else. It’s inspired by Bridget Riley, the foremost exponents of optical art and was perfectly executed by Cole Coating. See more at the Saffron Frameworks Twiter.

Jan 8, 2018 2 comments
The Col Collective: Passo del Mortirolo

Located in Sondrio and Brescia in northern Italy, the Passo del Mortirolo is the Giro’s version of the often snowy Passo di Gavia.

Jan 4, 2018 Comments are OFF
The Radavist’s Lucky 13 Beautiful Bicycles of 2017

For many, a New Year means time for reflection, and time for prospectives. For cyclists, this often includes planning out a build for a planned ride or perhaps updating your favorite bike with new gear. Perhaps that’s the motivation for many of you to visit this site. For us at the Radavist, we look at all the data from the past year’s content and begin to understand more what you, the readers, love to see here on the site.

Every bicycle on this list should come as no surprise. It was one of the most difficult selections in the history of this site, as almost all of these Beautiful Bicycles delivered similar metrics. We pulled these from the archives based on traffic, social media chatter and commentary. They’re displayed in no particular order. Omitted are bicycle reviews and completely bone stock production models – like the Jim Merz Sequoia and All-City Cosmic Stallion.

Thrown in, making it a baker’s dozen, is our top 2017 NAHBS pick as well. Without further adieu, here’ the Lucky 13 Beautiful Bicycles of 2017! (more…)

Jan 3, 2018 54 comments
Reilly’s Breadwinner Lolo Road

People often refer to steel road bikes as “lifetime” bicycles. A few years back, Reilly was looking for just that, a lifetime road bike. He scoured the internet, looking at all the offerings before settling on Portland’s Breadwinner Cycles and their Lolo road bike. These frames are made in-house, at Breadwinner in Portland and can be configured with various options directly from their website. Reilly’s build is beautiful, without being flashy, relying on Shimano Ultegra’s longevity to keep the wheels and gears turning.

Little details really make the build, like his Yanco handlebar bag, Manual for Speed bar tape and Vittoria Corsa tires on Pacenti rims. Bikes like this are just so right…

Dec 20, 2017 21 comments
2017 Philly Bike Expo: Stanridge Speed Road with FSA WE – Jarrod Bunk

2017 Philly Bike Expo: Stanridge Speed
Photos by Jarrod Bunk, Intro by John Watson and Words by Adam from Stanridge Speed

When modern builders utilize NOS tubing from the late 80’s, the results are more often than not, mind-blowing. Take this Stanridge Speed road bike from this year’s Philly Bike Expo. As soon as I saw it, I knew Adam had selected Gilco tubing (or is it?), yet there’s much more to the story, of which I’ll let Adam do the talking.

Adam, can you tell me about the Philly Bike Expo road bike? I’m suspecting there’s more than meets the eye here…

“I built the bike in conjunction with 7th and Park in Brownsville. It’s part of a larger project consisting of six available tubesets we’re making into frames. Three track and Three road. All the sets are NOS from the tail end of the golden era of steel in 1986. Most of the tubes are date coded. Columbus etched the iconic Dove and born on dates in the tubes in an effort to reduce false advertising by unscrupulous builders during this era. The story goes, builders in the 1980’s masked the imprinted doves on the tubing only to reveal the mark after the painting process.

One half of the Fabrica framebuilding team in Milano is a self-admitted nerd when it comes to NOS componentry including tubing. He scored the motherload of these NOS tubes a few years back. I met the guys at Fabrica through the RHC 5 years ago.. which ultimately led to the remaining tubing cache on the shelf within arms reach. What you see with the Columbus SLX tubing modified by Silva was an attempt to increase rigidity by adding surface area while remaining braze-able into a lug.

It was nice to work with the team at FSA to build a frame around their wireless WE group. Visually revisiting the smaller diameters feels refreshing in contrast to the current double oversize shaped modern steel offerings. It’s the Juxtaposition. These tubes remind me of how steel has constantly been Johnny Hustle over the years – the hardest worker – in this case – to stay competitive against aluminum in the eyes of a broad consumer base.

I like underdogs and I’ve never waivered from Steel.

How does this tubeset feel? Do you think it ever had the slightest idea these components would be hung from its bones… Ha. Too much time alone at the workbench I guess.”

Now that’s a story!

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Follow Jarrod on Instagram, and Stanridge Speed on Instagram

Nov 27, 2017 25 comments