#four-corners-guides

tag

Push, Paddle, Pedal: Solo Packrafting with Lizzy Scully of Four Corners Guides

Reportage

Push, Paddle, Pedal: Solo Packrafting with Lizzy Scully of Four Corners Guides

I love being alone all day, deep in remote and wild areas, reliant only on myself to move through the landscape, over difficult terrain, and in bad weather. I enjoy utilizing the various ultralight backcountry travel skills I’ve gleaned since my early twenties. And I feel immense joy when I can be efficient and accomplish goals. I’m also really afraid of the dark. Not so much of wild animals, but rather of wild weirdos who wander the woods and kill innocent middle-aged women. I know. Super unlikely. But I never sleep much at night while on solo adventures.

Mostly I have backpacked alone or solo aid climbed big walls. But I stopped climbing after a gnarly accident where a friend fell 100 feet and nearly died. I also quit backpacking because the annoying arthritic autoimmune disease I suffer from incapacitates me if I hike more than a few miles with weight on my back. Luckily a few years ago I discovered the horizontal world of multi-sport adventure travel.

Maine: America’s New Fatbiking Biking Mecca?

Reportage

Maine: America’s New Fatbiking Biking Mecca?

My friend Seth Levy, an obsessive bicyclist of the most masochistic variety, relentlessly tried to get me to fatbike with him when I lived in Maine in the mid-2010s.

“But I don’t like being cold, and I’m not a cyclist,” I explained. Maine’s long winters were glum, wet, and frigid. I preferred being in front of my wood-burning stove. And improved weather meant rock climbing.

Ignoring me, he enthused that I could ride fat-tire bikes all year round.

“Fatbikes open up so much more terrain for winter AND summer,” he explained. Yes, Maine has long winters, but also long springs “filled with mud, wet rocks and sloppy dirt roads,” perfect for a fatbike, not to mention great terrain to ride in the summer (aka “black fly season”).

“I’m not a skilled mountain biker, but I can do things with a fatbike I didn’t know were possible,” he added. “A steep hillside covered with roots and rocks becomes something you can ride up with a fatbike. Plus it’s such a new sport. Nobody is good at it!”

A Look at the Bikeraft Guide

Radar

A Look at the Bikeraft Guide

Bikerafting is when you incorporate a bike onto a packraft like an Alpacka Raft. While navigating rivers and other bodies of water shouldn’t be taken with a grain of salt and if you don’t have whitewater experience, you should seek out proper training before embarking on a packraft or bikerafting trip. Once you’ve done that, buy this book for inspiration. The Bikeraft Guide is a 325 page book, packed with stories, instructional how-tos, illustrations, and more. It was compiled by Lizzy and Doom of Four Corners Guides and is a great companion for those bikeraft curious. Let’s take a quick look below…

Our Solstice Packraft Paddle on the San Miguel River with Four Corners Guides

Reportage

Our Solstice Packraft Paddle on the San Miguel River with Four Corners Guides

With my partner Cari’s birthday always falling on the Summer Solstice, it’s usually up to her to decide how we spend the longest day of the year. This year, with temps in the 90s here in Santa Fe, we were excited to get out on the river in our Alpacka rafts with our friends Doom and Lizzy from Four Corners Guides, where we spent our Solstice evening on the San Miguel river…

Our Swift Campout Was a Little Different thanks to Four Corners Guides

Radar

Our Swift Campout Was a Little Different thanks to Four Corners Guides

We hope everyone got out and camped under the stars with their friends, both new and old for the Swift Campout! We’ve got some stories to share next week but we just wanted to extend a huge thanks to our friends Doom and Lizzy at Four Corners Guides for taking us out on a river overnighter. It’s not often we get to campout on the river, so this made for a truly unique experience…

Don’t forget to email us your Swift Campout stories!