One Arm Bandit: Little Wings, Big Things

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One Arm Bandit: Little Wings, Big Things

One Arm Bandit: Little Wings, Big Things
Photos and words by Ryan Le Garrec

François is what you would call in French a “fonceur”.
Literally, the word means “fast guy” but it’s more of an expression.
It evokes enthusiasm, determination, well, a lot of will and positivity,
and I couldn’t think of a better way to define this guy.
He won’t take no for an answer. From anyone. He is driven.

At the beginning, he was the first messenger working for Hush Rush, that another François created. He soon took the project by himself and managed to develop it into a real company.

Dropping In: Medicare for All, Adventuring, and You!

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Dropping In: Medicare for All, Adventuring, and You!

Dropping In: Medicare for All, Adventuring, and You
Words by Kyle von Hoetzendorff

If you’re alive then at some point you’ve had a health issue; hangnails to broken bones, common colds to genetic disorders. Being alive means being at the mercy of injury and sickness, precarity is part of the human experience. The degree to which each one of us has to address health in a very large part comes down to luck; genetic, location, etc. It would be one thing we choose to live in a padded room with platinum-level HEPA filters and a well-curated mix of cultural sensory input to prevent the self-inflicted harm that would surely stalk anyone forced to live in a padded cell their entire life. But then that’s the point, most of us don’t want to live in hypo-precarity.

Dispatch From the Badlands – Carmen Aiken

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Dispatch From the Badlands – Carmen Aiken

Dispatch From the Badlands
Photos and words by Carmen Aiken

On the dotted line to Sheep Mountain Table, I suddenly brake. Something tilts in my nervous system, tugs. The summer’s off-pavement riding has me forgetting the sweetness of an emptiness’s quiet when your contraption and all the nonsense it carries is, for a moment, still. What do you matter? The rocks rest as they wont to do, I suppose, the world ticks to its own endless motion, even as it’s stupidly being timed and quantified on devices it doesn’t give a shit about.

SWOT and the North Cape 4000 – Erik Nohlin

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SWOT and the North Cape 4000 – Erik Nohlin

SWOT and the North Cape 4000
Words by Erik Nohlin, photos by Beth Welliver

Editor’s note: this is a long piece, but I wanted to leave it mostly unedited to maintain Erik’s voice, and all are encouraged to ask Erik questions here, just 24 hours before he departs for the North Cape 4000. So feel free to ask away and hopefully he’ll have time to address any questions you might have!

Fuck.
Wednesday / July 11 2018 / 04.22 am / Orlando International Airport / T-16 days to NC4000
Dehydrated and wrecked after canceled flights and a week on the road hunting Tour de France in cars, being off the bike completely for eleven days while eating shitty gas station food. The longest ride I’ve ever done is two weeks away and I’m lacking the fitness I wish I had enough of to relax about it at this point. Gear is not dialed and there’s a lot of questions without known answers right now. I’ll use this piece as a checklist, trying to get some answers for myself and to give you a picture of what’s in my head right now as I write this on a plane from Orlando to San Francisco, but first some context and a SWOT, a thing I tend to do when shit’s about to hit the fan. When this is published in two weeks from now, we’ll be on our way to the start in the north Italian city of Arco on July 28th.

Riding Mountains on the New Santa Cruz Bicycles Bronson and 5010 in Los Angeles

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Riding Mountains on the New Santa Cruz Bicycles Bronson and 5010 in Los Angeles

Tyler wanted to get a limited slip differential installed in his Volvo 142. The problem is, Tyler lives in Santa Cruz where he works for Santa Cruz Bicycles in the design department, and the Volvo experts were down in Long Beach. No one wants to drive from Santa Cruz to Los Angeles on the weekend, and the shop was closed then anyway, so what’s a dude with a slick Volvo to do? The genius of this whole ordeal was that Tyler, and David – two design department dudes at Santa Cruz Bicycles – were able to convince their bosses to let them ride the newest bike models down in Los Angeles, allowing Tyler’s car to get worked on while we shredded some of the area’s best trails. I’m sure it didn’t hurt to have me offer to show them around, ride the new bikes and obviously tell a story about the whole shindig. Sure, this is about the bikes, as much as it is about showing Tyler and David Los Angeles’ best trails in a condensed, two-day experience.

Playing host in Los Angeles is as much fun as it is hard work. Hard in the sense that these are my local trails that I ride quite frequently, so seeing the “new” in the familiar can be photographically challenging. Add to that, technically I’m injured. I found out right before the guys rolled into town that my pinky was indeed broken from a collision with a Prius’ side view mirror one day while I was riding home. That incident happened almost a month prior. Bummer for me, my bike control, and the potential to have a full-on shred fest, but I was so excited to ride the new 5010, so I sucked it up, taped my finger, and clipped in…

The SIQuoia Tandem – Erik Nohlin and Dylan Buffington

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The SIQuoia Tandem – Erik Nohlin and Dylan Buffington

The SIQuoia Tandem
Photos by Dylan Buffington and Words by Erik Nohlin

Tandem’s always been like Fat bikes to me, I don’t really know why but I want one. They’re easy to fall in love with I guess, cartoonish and rad/dorky looking, raising questions about how it would be chasing the sunset on one. Ever since I designed the Sequoia at Specialized about three years ago, I’ve been thinking about how to make a tandem. As a designer and bikeaholic, I always have a million ideas and projects around, 99% never seeing daylight. A Sequoia tandem, however, would be a project fairly easy to pull off if made the right way.

Introducing the Made in Portland Parsec Bicycles All Road

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Introducing the Made in Portland Parsec Bicycles All Road

Jumping back in time a bit to the Chris King Swarm event in Bend, I was able to document a new brand’s all-road offering.

Parsec Bicycles is a new brand out of Portland, Oregon, offering up these beautiful all-road bikes, designed for everything from races like the Lost and Found, to bikepacking, road riding and beyond. As the name implies, the flashy space-age bikes look like something from a Star Wars movie – ATMO – with a vibrant metallic paint job and elegant bends.

The man behind the brand is Erik Fenner from Chris King. He’s designing these bikes, while Oscar from Simple Bicycle Co. is building them from a mix of Columbus tubing and ex-Cielo painter Steven Smith is painting them. The rough plan is to have the bikes launch on Kickstarter soon, with a $5,000 complete price tag as shown, minus the Andrew the Maker bags, which, I’m sure he’d be willing to make you a set for your Kickstarter bike once you receive it.

This bike is one of those examples of a machine where photos do not do it justice, although I tried my hardest to capture just how beautiful it is.

See more at Parsec Bicycles.

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Follow Parsec Bicycles on Instagram.

Team Scrapin’s Rock Lobster Relationship Accelerator – Amanda Schaper

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Team Scrapin’s Rock Lobster Relationship Accelerator – Amanda Schaper

Team Scrapin’s Rock Lobster Relationship Accelerator
Words by Amanda Schaper, photos by John Watson

Some people might call tandems divorcycles, but I like to call them relationship accelerators. Wherever your relationship is headed, a tandem bicycle will get you there faster.

The Lost and Found Bike Ride is always one of my favorite weekends of the year. The camping, the riding, the lake, the people, the beer…it all just makes for one heck of a good time. But this year was extra special. My fiancé Scott and I toed the line for the 100-mile gravel race on our amazing Rock Lobster tandem in the first of the Triple Crown events. We’re planning to race the full Lost Sierra Triple Crown on the tandem as our form of premarital counseling. What could go wrong, right? There was some competition in the tandem category at Lost and Found, with two other teams giving us a run for our money. After about 6.5 hours of racing and getting both wheels off the ground more than once, we crossed the line in victory! It wasn’t easy, but it was a heck of a lot of fun. Our relationship and the bike survived 100 miles of gravel grinding, and now we start prepping for the gnarly technical trails of the Downieville Classic.

Builders for Builders: a Lost & Found Custom Bike Raffle for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship

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Builders for Builders: a Lost & Found Custom Bike Raffle for the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship

This year, I’ll be covering the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship’s Triple Crown events: Lost & Found, Grinduro, and the Downieville Classic. My intent with this is to grow the Stweardship’s presence, help them raise money and spread the stoke for the Lost Sierra. Jumping on board with this project is just the icing on the dirt cake!

“Custom frame makers Sklar, Stinner, Mosaic, and McGovern have teamed up with world-class component makers ENVE, Chris King, SRAM and WTB to create four unique and beautiful custom bicycles that will be raffled after the gun goes off for the Lost and Found Gravel race. All proceeds will benefit the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship.

Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship is a non-profit organization that builds and maintains multi-use trails in the Sierra Buttes, Tahoe, Plumas and Lassen national forests. Their mission is building sustainable recreation-based communities through stewardship, job creation and hosting world-class events. SBTS has donated an estimated 72,000 hours of volunteer labor, maintained over 800 miles of shared use trails and created nearly 80 miles of new trails since 2003.

The bikes will be exhibited at the Lost and Found gravel race and the raffle will be live, with $20 tickets, from June 2nd through June 15th, hosted by The Pro’s Closet. All donations and raffle ticket purchases are tax deductible.”

Check out more details on these bikes and how to buy a raffle ticket below!

Divas and Snakes Don’t Mix: Crust Bikes in Puerto Rico – Angelica Casaverde

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Divas and Snakes Don’t Mix: Crust Bikes in Puerto Rico – Angelica Casaverde

Divas and Snakes Don’t Mix: Crust Bikes in Puerto Rico
Words by Angelica Casaverde, photos by Matt Whitehead

I am the tiniest diva on two wheels. When I say I’m a diva, I’m not trying to be cute, I am all capitals, in bold DIVA. I’m the one who gets someone to carry the heavy stuff and do all the physical work because I can’t be bothered. I love my lavender candle, my bed, and my Netflix chill time. I prioritize looking good and feeling 100. With all that being said you can see how bikes and bike touring don’t exactly fit into my idea of a good time. I didn’t choose a life of bikes, I fell in love with Matt and consequently married into this crazy shit. The morning we exchanged vows I inherited Crust Bikes as the loosest, most flamboyant adopted child I never anticipated having. Matt and bikes until I die.

What Six Months of Sobriety Has Done for Me and My Riding

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What Six Months of Sobriety Has Done for Me and My Riding

We often read about people taking a month off from drinking, for a number of reasons. Perhaps to lose weight, or gain clarity, or most often, “I’ve been going at it too hard.” Well, what happens when that month turns to two, then three, and doesn’t stop at six? A while back, I was dealing with depression, stressed out, gaining weight, increasingly cynical and argumentative. Drinking had become a daily habit, usually beginning after a ride, or after growing tired of sitting at my desk working. The day to day grind had been complicated with a new form of cyclical behavior; ride bikes to get over the hangover, not just for enjoyment.

When you’re riding to get over a hangover, you’ll find that you don’t really enjoy riding bikes anymore. Or at least that’s how I was feeling. Every ride was a struggle, both mentally and physically. I felt drained, exhausted and would get angry at myself for “letting myself go.” In reality, I was in great physical shape, my body was just mad at me for poisoning it.

Then I went to a doctor for my semi-regular physical and got some bad news.

Un-Lost: Camille McMillan’s Photographs of the Transcontinental Race

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Un-Lost: Camille McMillan’s Photographs of the Transcontinental Race


Photos by Camille McMillan

Every photograph has a story and for Camille, it centers around the tale of the TCR.

“Camille McMillan has followed the riders of the Transcontinental Race with his camera for the last three editions of the race, capturing their journeys from one corner of Europe to the other.

The Transcontinental is a self-supported bikepacking race, with riders finding their own way for over 4000km. To paraphrase the race’s founder, Mike Hall, “if you get lost, you will need to get un-lost.” Camille’s photographs capture the riders as they navigate unfamiliar and vast landscapes of Europe, showing that in an age of SPOT trackers, GPS and Google Maps, there’s something to be said for being lost and finding your way again.”

Head to Un-Lost to see Camille’s prints for sale, or to an Apidura retailer to see a selection of artist proofs in person.

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Leave it On the Road in Ireland

LIOTR’s “the Big Lap” project video is live and I must say, it’s a great watch!

“Conor Brady grew up in Ireland, where his father Bill would leave every August on a two week ride around the country. A ride he called “the big lap.” Bill Brady lost his battle with pancreatic cancer in 2013, and Conor never got to share that ride with him. In the summer of 2017, Conor pieced together his father’s route from his old maps, and he and the Leave It On The Road crew set out to recreate The Big Lap, riding 1,000 miles in 10 days to raise donations for the Hirshberg Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer.

To date Leave It On The Road has raised over $100,000 for cancer-fighting non-profits by planning epic rides with purpose. Learn more and get involved at leaveitontheroad.com

A Weekend and Then Some at the Downieville Classic

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A Weekend and Then Some at the Downieville Classic

11am. We had to be in Downieville by 11am for a special ride. A VIP ride if you will. Paul Components bought a morning shuttle to do the classic Downieville Downhill shuttle. There were 12 spots and Kyle and I had to boogie ASAP from Northstar. Luckily, long nights and early mornings were the norm on this trip, so we loaded up the ‘Cruiser and headed to Downieville.

Our Raidō in Iceland and Embracing the Weather

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Our Raidō in Iceland and Embracing the Weather

Raidō is the r-rune of the Elder Futhark, an old proto-Germanic language, used by northern European civilizations. Its meaning translates to the ride or the journey and has been the icon of this website for years, at least in spirit. For Cari’s birthday this year, we wanted to do something new and challenging. We both had our picks for a vacation. Mine was a bicycle tour in Madagascar and hers was backpacking in Iceland. Luckily for Cari, it was her birthday, so she had the final say in the matter. All she wanted was to be on a trail during the Summer Solstice and her birthday, so we began planning…

HIA Velo Introduces Allied Cycle Works and the US-Made ALFA Road

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HIA Velo Introduces Allied Cycle Works and the US-Made ALFA Road

I am very excited about this project. While there are other US-made carbon road frames on the market, the scope and scale of Allied Cycle Works, under the HIA Velo umbrella, is very promising. Their first road frame is the ALFA, and it’s made in their Arkansas facilities from start to finish. There’s more on this to come, but for now, you can read the press-release below.

The Radavist’s Top 10 and Then Some Beautiful Bicycles of 2016

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The Radavist’s Top 10 and Then Some Beautiful Bicycles of 2016

Call it what you will, but 2016 was an interesting year and I’m not just talking politics! There were a lot of incredible bicycles featured here on the site, many with even more interesting stories and some were even affected by the events of 2016. We’ll get into that a bit later. Grading these beautiful machines is anything but easy and usually requires a few days of data compiling, including but not limited to social media chatter, visits, comments and time spent on that particular page. Since all bikes can be beautiful, this list includes both custom and production bicycles. Some of these will be a no-brainer, others even surprised me. Without further adieu, here are the Radavist’s Top 10 and Then Some Beautiful Bicycles of 2016, in no particular order.