Philly Bike Expo 2018: Coast Cycles Randonneur – Jarrod Bunk

Philly Bike Expo 2018: Coast Cycles Randonneur
Photos and words by Jarrod Bunk

Brooklyn’s Johnny Coast knows a thing or two about traditional randonneuring frames, as evident in this year’s Philly Bike Expo bike. Thin lugs, light tubing, custom stem, and all the appropriate accouterment. Built from Tange lightweight tubing, Johnny designed this bike to be light and responsive, offering a lively feel.

Coast Cycles offers bikes like this, as well as touring bikes, city bikes, mixte, road bikes, and even track bikes.

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Follow Jarrod on Instagram, and Coast Cycles  on Instagram

  • singlespeedscott

    Lovely build. It’s good to see some 700c randonneurs.

    However, as good as it looks, the Campagnolo 10 speed Veloce rear derailleur and the standard barrel diameter, down tube shifter don’t work the best. I’ve tried it at home and found that the down tube shifter had to rotate 180 degrees to cover the cassette range. To make it work you need Campagnolo downtube shifters, which means index shifting as they don’t come in friction with the larger barrel.

    • IssacBabel

      DiaCompe make a large barrel version of their d/t shifter for 11s.

      https://velo-orange.com/products/dia-compe-ene-11s-dt-shifters

      • singlespeedscott

        Awesome to know. You’ve made my day. The 10 speed GS Campagnolo Veloce rear derailleur, in silver is a great looking rear derailleur with useful 32 wrap and a max rear cog of 30 teeth. The lack of a downtube shifter that can pull enough cable has stopped me using it.

    • john coast

      it IS a nine speed!

  • Sattelfest

    Where ist John? We want John…We want John…(-;

  • nothingfuture

    This is a *very* pretty bike. The lug lining and (is that chrome or stainless?) seatstay/chainstays are especially handsome.
    Honest question: I know the Rene Herst cranks have a following, but I’m unsure of the appeal. Is it esthetics? Or something else? I find the non-standard three bolt tiny diameter spider off putting myself, but it occurs to me it’s tiny circumference might be it’s strength in allowing a wider spread of chainring sizes. Am I missing something? (Please don’t take any of the above as attacking the cranks- they’re clearly lovely bits of kit- I’m just trying to more fully understand their advantages)

    • Nick Paglia

      The small BCD allows the 46/30t combo to exist. Why is that chainring combination important? It allows the rider to use modern “road” cassettes (take for example the 11-30t, 11spd) to take advantage of tight gear spacing while also allowing a full range of climbing gears. This becomes especially useful on longer Brevets where fatigue can be managed by dialing in the right gear/cadence.

      • nothingfuture

        Ok- I get that. But can’t you run a 4 x 104mm and do the same combo? (I know 30t is at the hairy edge of a 4 x 104mm- but the even-older 5 x 94 would work too, I’d think).
        So is it a matter of q-factor? (mtb cranks tending to be wider?)

        • Nick Paglia

          You could run a mountain crank but Q-Factor and chain line optimization would be my guess. A bit of esthetics there too.

        • Andrew Demack

          Yes, there’s some amount of NOS TA chain rings in 94 bcd. That’s how I got my 42-30 done, with a 94 bcd spider & crank from Middleburn (now made by BETD in the UK). And internal bottom bracket which lets me tweak q-factor and chainline.

        • Andrew Demack

          Alee Denham from Cycling About has put a lot of time and effort into spelling out some options for lower gears on road/touring/rando bikes: https://www.cyclingabout.com/wider-gear-range-road-shifters-gears-for-easier-hill-climbing/

          Would be nice if Shimano just decided to make a 46-30 though wouldn’t it!

          • Nick Paglia

            FSA has been moving closer with a full range of “adventure” cranksets in 48/32 and 46/30t.

          • ascpgh

            Shimano has no gas in their tank for real cyclists. Their groups have nearly become “all in” and have some serious aesthetic deficits. I think there’s more consumer demand for 7400 Ultegra and the early XTR parts than any of the new stuff. The big bike companies create the demand for groups as OEM. Not me or many I know.

    • Matthew J

      Personally prefer TA, but the RH crankset design allows for a rather light crank despite which by many accounts any way appears to be durable.

    • Peter Chesworth

      Many of the answers are on here – be careful, once you start reading this blog it can be hard to pull yourself away.
      https://janheine.wordpress.com/2016/02/25/rene-herse-cranks-177-and-165-mm/

    • ascpgh

      The process of construction and precision of finished product. BTW- you see the enormity of odd four bolt “compact” cranksets? Not just Campy being proprietary about four holes. I’m getting a Herse for my Coast since TA quit making the Zephyr.

  • George T Rosselle

    The photo of the front hub is hilarious. Did the photographer do that on purpose?

  • mark rothschild

    Another Great Rando..but really,12 Speeds??? …”Nine is Fine”

    • john coast

      tis 9 and its fine

    • mark rothschild

      OOPS!…Thanks,”Johnny on the Spot”..mixed with Below Eagle…Maybe a Neurologist.is needed!

  • john coast

    you guys! it a nine speed!

  • Frank DuCett

    Beautiful from every direction

  • Frank DuCett

    The fork rake, look closely at how graceful they curve and taper, this is the secret of this bike’s appeal.