Category Archives: road bike
Mark’s Team Telekom Eddy Merckx MX-Leader
Mark's Team Telekom Merckx MX-Leader

A few people have asked what bike I was pedaling around on the Eroica California course. While it doesn’t meet the pre-1987 guidelines, it’s vintage enough for my tastes. The MX-Leaders have always had a soft spot in my heart. Arguably the most significant bikes to ever leave the Merckx factory, these were race-ready, pedigree machines. Made with Merckx’s proprietary lugs and Columbus MXL tubesets, they were some of the stiffest steel frames at the time.

Perfect for the US team Motorola, or in this case, team Telekom. This frame in particular was Brian Holm’s and while a majority of the MX-Ls were raced with Dura Ace 7400, the bike’s owner, Mark Riedy, decided to go a bit more practical – and classy IMO – with a 10-speed Campagnolo gruppo. He then topped the cockpit off with an ITM stem.

There’s something about the Telekom paint jobs that always did it for me. Flashy, yet classy and an undeniable style. I’d love to add one of these to my collection some day.

Feb 6, 2015 31 comments
Dan Chabanov’s Van Dessel Hellafaster Frame is Made in the USA
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Photos by Dan Chabanov

The Van Dessel Hellafaster caught me off guard when it launched. It, along with the Aloominator, boasted performance-minded precision with a phrase you don’t see too often for a $1,500 frameset: made in the USA.

These bikes are made in Portland and are ready for anything. With Di2 compatibility, 28mm tire clearance – fenders! and a sick, black anodized finish, it’s no wonder the Hellafaster is a prime choice for a training or race bike.

Perhaps that’s why Dan Chabanov picked one up? For whatever reason, I’ve had these photos for a while, but totally blanked on posting them, until Dan just called me out – albeit for the 10th time.

Frames like this are important to the US-made cycling industry, so shame on me for blanking on posting these photos. Van Dessel, you’re doing it right.

See more of Dan’s photos below and if you have ANY questions, Ask Dan at his Tumblr.

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Feb 5, 2015 10 comments
SRAM Rival 22

Rival is one of the most affordable road groups on the market, without sacrificing performance or style. As we saw with the Saila titanium cross build, it doesn’t distract from the bike, yet with 11 speed control, you still get the same precision as the higher end groups. Check out this quick spot showcasing it on a disc road and see more on Rival at SRAM.

Feb 5, 2015 18 comments
Fairdale Holds a Torch for Chromoly
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While plenty of companies select a blank frame from a catalog and slap a few stickers on them before calling them a day, Fairdale takes more time to design their frames from the ground up. Taj recently illustrated a story on the Fairdale blog, explaining how they design their bikes, particularly the Goodship.

Head on over to read up!

Feb 5, 2015 3 comments
Ritte Cycles Unleashes the Ace Performance Road
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I like the looks and body language of this bike. The Ritte Ace is taking over the road racing lineup, utilizing true one-piece monocoque construction, positive molding with a T700/T1000 Carbon Layup and integrated Di2 or mechanical cabling setups. Because bigger is better, the Ace will also fit 25mm – 28mm tires, depending on rim width and manufacturer’s specs.

Not everything is new with the Ace, however. Ritte adopted the geometry from their Vlaanderen model for familiar handling. See more specs and photos below.

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Feb 3, 2015 9 comments
The Long Road to Titus Canyon – Ryan Wilson
Horseshoe Meadows looms beneath the clouds.

The Long Road to Titus Canyon
Photos and words by Ryan Wilson

It started for me two years ago when I made my first trip to Death Valley National Park. I was rolling along the road to Ubehebe Crater when I passed a little dirt road named “Titus Canyon” that gradually sloped out of the valley floor until hitting a seemingly impassable rock wall a few miles in the distance. No signs of the road switching back and climbing over it… just abruptly ending.

Fast forward to a year later, I had done a bit of research and found that the road does in fact go through the range and over the Nevada border. It’s a 25 mile stretch of dirt that is a one-way road from the Nevada side into California. Plans were set, and I was going to give it a shot. Only hitch was that I wanted to climb it rather than descend it (on a road bike), so I would be heading up going the “wrong” direction, then looping around over a paved pass back into Death Valley…

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Jan 29, 2015 38 comments
What is This, Eddy Merckx?
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So, a reader sent this over, with the subject line “I think this is ok to share” and all that was in the body was this photo. A quick glance at the Eddy Merckx Facebook reveals it’s a tig-welded steel bike, commemorating Eddy’s 70th birthday, which would make sense, but details like pricepoint, country of origin, tubing, etc, etc, etc, seem to be missing.

Personally, I’d rather see a lugged Columbus frame with a steel fork. As far as pricepoint, I’m gonna guess this bike is upwards of $10k, complete… Does anyone have any more information on this?

Turns out, Peloton has the full scoop. Head over there to see more information. It’s stainless steel, hence the tig welding and made in Belgium. Oh and it’s $17k!

Jan 28, 2015 19 comments
Chris’ Davidson Impulse Road with Campy 10-Speed
Chris' Davidson Impulse with Campagnolo 10 Speed

In Seattle, a local staple has closed its doors. Back in September of last year, Elliott Bay Bicycles, home of Davidson Cycles, shut down. Luckily the in-house brand of frames, made by hand since 1973, by Bill Davidson lives on.

Even though Davidson is a Seattle-based framebuilder, his work can be seen from coast to coast, from vintage steel to modern composite. Although Bill only currently offers road frames, he makes them in a variety of materials. As a Davidson customer, you can chose between composite, steel or titanium, all of which are done in house. While the modern bikes have their own character, there’s something about a frame from the late 80’s and early 90’s. They all have a certain finesse that’s harder to achieve these days with modern materials.

This particular frame was most likely made in the mid to late 1980’s, if the 1″ threaded steerer and internally-lugged unicrown fork is any indication. Chris scored it off eBay as he was looking for a traditionally lugged frame to kick around town on. Fit with a mix of Campagnolo 10-speed, the bike looks like a classic road from the 80’s, yet has the technology from a modern road group.

Bottom line, she’s a looker. See more in the Gallery.

Jan 26, 2015 20 comments