Category Archives: Recent Roll
Epilogue – Themes While Bicycle Touring Through China
Shot from a Moving Bicycle 04 - The roads were mostly empty in the industrial areas.

After looking back through all 800 photos I shot while on bicycle tour through China with Mission Workshop and Factory 5, I had a hard time breaking it down to a cohesive gallery show.

What I began to notice were themes in the photos, not apparent as I flipped through the files, but when I printed out a selection of photos, they began to tie in together. These themes represent not only my eye for cycling in urban environments, but also my background education and professional career as an architect.

China really changed my perspective on the world as a whole. I saw beautiful landscapes destroyed in the name of progress and capitalism. I witnessed a precious and old culture wiped out to assimilate with a preconceived notion of luxury. Everywhere I looked, I saw western civilization to blame.

Globalization, our desire to own and consume had changed China. Granted I had no benchmark for the status quo, I could only gather enough information through examining the landscapes.

The Chinese build for the sake of building. Supply and demand is a skewed balance, tilted in the former’s favor. This growth is unwarranted and most importantly, uncontrolled.

So where did this bike tour fall into place? It was, after all, Mission Workshop’s idea. While I was given no direction, no instructions, I did have really, complete freedom to do what I wanted.

We had an agenda: test out the new US-manufactured Acre clothing while riding a bicycle through some of the most polluted areas of China and document the trip for a gallery show. Was it successful? I’d say so…

Which brings me to this post: a selection of 50 photos, all shot with my Mamiya 7ii and Kodak Portra 400. These photos break down into illustrative observations, all of which are noted in the photo’s title. Some are obvious, others are not.

You’ll see the themes fairly easily and I’d like to hear what you have to say about them. Feel free to critique / comment, just be polite and constructive.

Many thanks to Mission Workshop / Acre, the Factory 5 crew and anyone that helped us on this journey.

Jan 8, 2014 24 comments
Happy Holidays!

I just wanted to thank all the viewers, friends and sponsors of PiNP. You’ve made 2013 a great year! Enjoy the holidays with your friends and family.

Dec 25, 2013 5 comments
Get out This Weekend!

I still have so much leftover film from China, with some of my favorites being the roll of 220 I shot in the bamboo forest on the Mamiya. The guys from Factory 5 rode up to the top of this mountain range on their track bikes and I was on my cross bike, getting shots along the way.

Nov 8, 2013 3 comments
#LASucksForCycling
As did Andy. But hey, LA sucks for cycling...

LA has a bad rep for cycling. Just the other day I got in a debate with someone at a bar because they literally said “LA sucks for cycling”. I laughed, thinking they were referring to the hashtag (right?), only to find a solid 10 minute debate followed. Basically, any city is what you make of it. It’s your attitude and approach that changes your outlook.

I went through so much film during my last stay in Los Angeles and that’s probably because we rode every single day. Some of the rides I had done before, but having Andy along brought a new perspective. We rode mostly cross bikes and even the “road rides” had a fair amount of dirt thrown in.

Here’s a collection of a few rides, in a playful Photoset. See more in the Gallery!

Tools of the trade:
Yashica T4 / Fuji Pro400H

Oct 14, 2013 7 comments
Recent Roll: Ride Til Death
94550024

Hopefully, “til death” is a ways away for you but here’s a friendly reminder to get out this weekend and ride!

Oct 12, 2013 Comments are OFF
Zion
Strawfoot and Mudfoot

So there we were, planning our drive to Las Vegas for Interbike when Andy throws out the idea “mates, let’s go to the Grand Canyon”, like it’s on the way or something. Personally, I’d rather spend a day or two riding in LA than on the road, so I schemed with Kyle on how to convince the Aussie that there are perfectly fine parks not as far out of the way.

Solution: Zion National Park. We’d drive straight through Vegas and head two hours east. Get there in time to swim and then go on a hike before camping that night. Simple enough. So we drove and landed in Zion with two hours of sunlight remaining. Our agenda: Angel’s Landing.

I had one roll of film left.

See more in the Gallery!

Tools of the trade:
Leica M7 / Zeiss 28mm / Fuji Pro400H

Oct 11, 2013 14 comments
The End of Summer Bummers
RecentRoll-COVER

It’s the end of Summer. That means my busiest time of year is finally over. After finally combing through all my random film scans, I’ve pulled together a big photoset filled with shots from all over the globe. From Zurich to Columbus, there are some gems in this one. See for yourself in the Gallery!

Tools of the trade:
Yashica T4 / Leica M7 28mm / Neopan 400

Oct 9, 2013 8 comments
Topanga Trail Ripping
Chasing

For some self-deprecating reason, we decided to go ride mountain bikes in Topanga, the day after we climbed Mt. Gleason. Nothing like getting out of bed at the crack of dawn the morning after a 100 mile, 10,000′ ride. Was it worth it? Hell yes.

Topanga Creek Bicycles supplied Andy and me with rentals and Sean from Team Dream Bicycling Team was our guide. On the agenda for the day: Backbone, J-Drop, Sullivan, Snake Stick, Squirrel Cage and other trails, but first, we’d start the day climbing all of Cheney into the trail system.

Basically, we had a cold start and climbed around 1,200′ in two miles. It sucked and the climbing didn’t stop there, because to go down, first you must go up. We totaled our day with 30 miles and 4,500′. The only thing that kept me from cracking at the end of the ride was the delicious banana bread the guys at Topanga Creek Bicycles had cooked up!

See more in the Gallery!

Tools of the trade:
Yashica T4
Neopan 400

Oct 7, 2013 3 comments
Locals Only Ride in Los Angeles
Two different kinds of "morning commutes". I love this shot.

Locals Only isn’t about exclusivity when used in this context, because truth be told, each time I’ve been on this ride, there are usually more out of towners than locals. It’s more of a way that Kyle and Ty like to throw visitors into the proverbial fire. The first time I did this ride, it was at night, in the rain, during goat head season and with no lights. It sucked. This time, it was rad. I won’t post the route (locals only, breh), but we did about 25 miles and 3,000′.

Check out more in the Gallery!

Oct 4, 2013 7 comments
Darkness Upon Mt. Low
Sun obscured by Aussie, on point.

“Los Angeles sucks for cycling”. You’ve heard it, hell, I’ve said it before. Before I had the right guides, to do the right rides, at the right time. See, LA is a special city. Take it at face value and you’ll succumb to ritz and the glamour, while overlooking the many mountain ranges in Los Angeles County.

While the road is one path traveled, the dirt is set aside for a different breed. I’m not talking about finely crushed gravel, this dirt is unforgiving, unpredictable and probably a lot better suited for larger tires.

Grades crush your legs, rocks, your tubes but if you can manage to pull it together mentally, especially when it’s the right time of day, you’ll soon forget about all that (and even the rapidly dropping temperature).

Kyle and Sean had the brilliant idea (really) to do dirt Mt. Lowe up to Mt. Wilson one night. A frontage road climb isn’t easy, even with cross gearing, but all the pain paid off as we snaked our way around the Mountains of Madness…

By the time we hit the 9 miles marker, we had climbed over 4,000′, setting the total for the day at 20 miles and 4,500′. It was a MTB ride on cross bikes. My only regret for the day was not having color film loaded in my T4. I saw a mountain lion, we got a few flats on the descent and I haven’t been that cold coming down from Wilson since forever!

See more in the gallery!

Tools of the trade:
Yashica T4
Neopan 400

Oct 2, 2013 3 comments