Twin Six’s Standard Rando $1900 Complete Comes in High Vis Jan 3, 2018

The Standard Rando is a great option for those looking for an all-weather commuter, or a bike to take on this year’s brevet calendar and at under $2,000 for a complete, it throws its cap in the ring as one of the more financially viable options out there. New for 2018 is this ultra high vis color, sure to keep you safe while you pedal from dawn til dusk.

See more at Twin Six!

  • Peter Chesworth

    Like. Wear with zesty orange viz vesty.

  • Andrew Deane

    Seems like this frame is getting kinda tired and needs a serious update.

    • What would constitute a serious update? Current standards would put flat mount and through axles on it, maybe more tire clearance. Otherwise what else do you want to change?

      • Andrew Deane

        All of that + a 44mm head tube so that (if desired) one can run a tapered carbon fork. I seems to me there are a lot of middle of the road steel frames like this (most a bit cheaper, some much cheaper when considering a complete) with pretty much the same specs. True, the fenders are flashy but some (myself included) would remove those first. Frankly, I would rather ride a straggler with can be found easily online for $1500-ish (complete).

        • Andrew Deane

          …But the colours are pretty.

        • Ben Shane

          I think this bike falls into the Straggler/Space Horse/Double Cross Disc market, and that’s a different market from the frame/bike with the specs you mentioned above. In general this $600-$1000 steel disc frame market is a mess, and very difficult to compare bikes apples to apples, I feel. But, I think there are examples of frames that are bridging the gap to that market, while staying pretty inexpensive, such as Kona Rove, and a lot of other companies will start to take notice and follow suit. The fenders definitely aren’t gonna be to everyone’s taste. That said, the thought of actually going out and spending $ on fenders, when these were included in the purchase of the bike, was pretty depressing.

          • Andrew Deane

            Maybe from a frame perspective (although this would be my last choice of the frames you list), but as a complete it seems a bit overpriced for what you get and doesn’t have the refinement (i.e. the space horse) or (admittedly less tangible) coolness of some of the others you mentioned. Fenders-schmenders. I guess for me it comes down to T6 presenting themselves as a ’boutique’ brand but providing a (not quite) QBP product. Their apparel is nice (I own lots) but their frames seem pretty much picked from the East Asian catalogue (and then painted trendy colours)

          • Peter Chesworth

            Not sure what the issue is with east Asia.

          • Andrew Deane

            I assume T6 does not produce these themselves that they likely originate in Taiwan or China. Nothing no wrong with that but it is a common practice in the bike world is it not?

          • Peter Chesworth

            Yes

          • Andrew Deane

            Hence my comment about picking it from a catalogue. Also, white Ican appreciate that maybe you think a steel fork with braze-owns is better for your riding applications, this is really an all-rounder that I have seen built up in a variety of ways so you would think versatility would be a virtue. Touring and bike packing is cool, but 95% of people who ride bikes don’t do that often (if ever) and may not be thinking of strapping stuff to their forks. Also, wouldn’t a 1 inch head tube be a backwards step? Like the too (on my 2or3 vintage rides) but that would make forward compatibility difficult if not down right frustrating. Moreover, anything other than a standard GXP BB should be killed dead (although that I recognize is my stated opinion and may not be shared by others…although they’ll eventually arrive at that same conclusion after riding shitty creaky BB’s for any period of time)

          • Peter Chesworth

            Can’t disagree on the whole :)

          • “Picking from a catalog” is not how it works in the majority of cases. Maybe for the absolute shittiest of bikes out there, particularly ultra-cheap carbon stuff. For the most part bikes like this from small companies are drawn up by designers at the company, they find a factory to work with, and then go through various prototyping stages finalizing design points and working out the QC bugs.

            Your complaints about the bike’s head tube diameter, axle standards, and fork compatibility are really personal preferences. 1-1/8 head tubes still look proportionally appropriate with slender steel tubes, through axle standards haven’t really settled out yet, and some people really don’t ever want a carbon fork on their bike. There’s still a market for bikes like this, that fit “old” wheels and brakes, and that don’t fit carbon forks.

      • Peter Chesworth

        Most “updates” of little or no value on bikes such as this – comfort over speed. Change 1” steerer or the standard BB or the dropouts? Well I guess you could, for the sake of it. A tapered carbon fork … steel with braze ons more useful.

        • This bike does have a press fit BB, though, which is unusual for a steel bike.

          • Peter Chesworth

            Bugger.

  • Ben Shane

    Just built one of these up as a flatbar commuter/lazy road bike with a bunch of parts I had sitting around. It’s pretty fun! I agree with Andrew, it’s not the most cutting edge frame design, (q/r, iso tabs) but it built up easily and rides great. I like the rear triangle design, with the wide-set chainstays and the wishbone/monostay design of the seatstays. Tough to beat for the $. Stoked to try it with 650b+ at some point. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0c3b7d121e2d7f047d79926cd933d1669f6e646551369151ab0484683d98e824.jpg

    • Andrew Deane

      Nice ride. Looks fun. I like the pink colour.