The Radavist Holiday Kinda Sorta Need List Dec 1, 2014


Let’s face it, if you’re reading this blog, chances are, you don’t really need anything, in the survival sense. Sure, the holidays are great for many things, most of which bearing more importance than sharing gifts. Bike rides, warm drinks, hiking, camping, all of which are for the most part, free for you to share with friends and family.

That said, it’s a lot of fun sharing gifts and whatever, it’s a once a year kinda thing. Most of these gifts are gauged around lifestyle and camping but all have a place in your day-to-day use.

Every holiday season, we compile a list of products that have piqued our interest here at the Radavist. Most of which are made domestically, be it Japan, Germany, the US and the UK. This year, because I know everyone’s on a budget we’re doing it a bit different, offering up alternatives that are more affordable… Only because I don’t want this list to be alienating.

When you can, buy locally. Did you know your local bike shop can also order camping gear from QBP? Now you do!

Check out the Radavist Holiday Kinda Sorta Need List below!


Osker Dopp Kit – Fabric Horse – $55

Everyone can use a dopp kit. Both men and women can benefit from having a durable and yes, stylish case for their toiletries when they travel. The new Osker Dopp Kit from Fabric Horse looks to keep your carry-on bag neat and organized.


Ring Tool – $28

Clever key rings that double as tools will forever be one of those thoughtful gifts that will get heavy use. Especially with all those hexheads! Check out the Ring Tool…


Pedal Ed – Winter Gear – $$ varies

Ranging from affordable gifts for your favorite bike mechanic to more expensive garments for your loved ones, Pedal Ed’s gear is all made either in Japan, the UK or Italy. From belts to caps and jackets, this brand has something for everyone.


Buy a 35mm point n shoot camera and film!

Go to your thrift stores, camera shops and yes, maybe Craigslist or eBay and find a compact, prime lens point n shoot 35mm camera. Then go to your local camera shop and buy film, a case or even a gift certificate. It’ll be the gift that keeps on giving.


Swift Industries – Southwest Neck Scarf – $48

Taking something as functional as a scarf and making it from Pendleton wool, then adding a snap so it’ll stay around your neck is ingenious! Making it by hand in Seattle is sustainable. These Swift Industries Southwest Neck Scarfs look great.


The Athletic – socks! – $$ varies

If one thing is true about the Athletic, it’s that they’ve got something for everyone when it comes to socks. This Portland brand began building hype on Instagram and now they’re got a brick and mortar shop. Made by DeFeet in the USA, these socks will last long through the winter months and then some.


Dave’s Killer Bread – Sin Dawg – $$ varies

Screw a snack bar! Go all in. 1600 calories per loaf, these tasty treats are perfect for winter base miles, randonneuring, touring or camping. Just seeing this photo makes my mouth water. They really are sinfully delicious… Don’t believe me? Try one on for size!


Weiss – Standard Issue Field Watch – $950

Some will say, these days, a wrist watch is a luxury item and while that’s true for the most part, it doesn’t mean you have spend thousands of dollars on a Swiss-made timepiece. Weiss makes their watches in Los Angeles, California from Swiss movement and unlike the other guys, that means everything but the movement is made in the USA. For alternatives, check Seiko, MWC and Timex. Or have a look at Huckberry’s Watch Guide.


Wald Basket – $$ varies

This is the best $20 I spent for my touring bike this year. Sometimes, the simplest designs are the best. Line the bottom with wood, or a tarp and add a bungee net for increased stability. Either use the brackets included, or zip-tie it to a small rack. What would you keep #InTheWald?


Horse Cycles – Handmade Copper Flask – $190

I used to lose my flasks all the time, then I bought an expensive flask and never lost it again (knock on oak barrels). These Horse flasks are made in NYC and would make a mean addition to the Moscow Mule attaché case. For alternative purchases, check out the classic flask by Stanley!


Western Mountaineering – Highlite bag – $330 – $350

A good, lightweight bag is one of the best items you can have in your bicycle camping inventory… Weighing in at just 16oz, this is one of the lightest 35º bags on the market and it’s made in the USA with a lifetime warranty.


Woodlands – Pendleton Wool Overshirt – $198

Yes, I know that’s a lot of money for a flannel, but the whole idea is you only need one or two and they’ll last you for years. As long as you don’t eat too many SinDawgs. I love the Woodlands flannels. They’re extremely comfortable, have a nice tailored fit and are perfect for winter bike camping. Highly recommended. If you’re on a tighter budget, check out Patagonia’s Fjord Flannel line.


Ocean Air Cycles – Helix Coffee Dripper Cone – $20

Sure, Ocean Air doesn’t make these Helix cones themselves, but they’re the ones who turned me onto them! Camp coffee, here we come!

  • carchiba

    Don’t forget to add the Silicone Collapse Bowl.

  • fyxo

    A camera truly is the gift that keeps giving. Cheap cameras make for better photographers.

  • Morgan Taylor

    Next up on The Radavist: A Cyclist’s Field Guide to 35mm Cameras Worth Owning. Written by Kyle Kelley. And go!

    • John Watson

      1: Yashica T4 Safari
      2: Contax T
      3: Olympus Stylus Epic

      • Powell

        I love my Olympus Stylus with a broken battery hinge that my girlfriend gave me. It wasn’t a holiday gift, but it’s something I cherish more than any of the holiday gifts I’ve probably ever gotten because of its personality and usefulness.

    • Jay Jacobsen

      I recommend the Kodak Retina IIIc 35mm rangefinder (Schneider-Kreuznach 50mm lens); fully manual. It takes excellent pictures and is smaller than a SLR or DSLR; a great handlebar bag companion! I have taken mine all over the world and love it.

  • mat Terwilliger

  • Jeff Lai

    I have the Ring Tool from Reductivist’s old school Kickstarter campaign. Super solid tool that has that well-machined feel, obviously. It carries well in a jersey pocket, but kind of pokes me the wrong way when I stow it in casual jeans/trouser pockets. Maybe I should just throw it in my tool roll and be done with it…

  • Kyle C

    My Fabric Horse hip bag (listed on their site as the Harper Pouch) is my favorite accessory, that company rules! It perfectly fits my Contax T2 and a few rolls of film, just sayin…

  • Jay Jacobsen

    I recommend the Kodak
    Retina IIIc 35mm rangefinder (Schneider-Kreuznach 50mm lens); fully manual. It takes
    excellent pictures and is smaller than a SLR or DSLR; a great handlebar bag
    companion! I have taken mine all over the world and love it!

  • Jon B.

    All that’s missing are some book suggestions. There are some rad vintage mtb books out for the holidays.

    • John Watson

      Fat Tire Flier!