Shinola’s First Titanium Watch: The Black Blizzard


All the style of a Shinola is now available in titanium for the first time ever with the Black Blizzard

“Shinola introduces The Black Blizzard, the latest evolution of Shinola’s flagship timepiece. Named for the dust storms that swept farmers off their land across the Great Plains, but built in honor of the tenacity and ingenuity of those that persevered, The Black Blizzard is an emblem of the American spirit.”


“Our most technically demanding Detroit-built timepiece to date, The Black Blizzard is constructed of titanium, with an iconic Shinola black dial, titanium sport turning topring and signature case back plate. Each watch is available in a 42mm and 48mm case and comes with an additional black rubber strap in addition the metal bracelet. The watch is driven by the Argonite 5050 high-accuracy quartz chronograph movement and has a 20ATM depth rating.

Each timepiece includes a leather-bound coffee table book on the dust storms it’s named for, featuring rare photos, newspaper clippings, and a concise history of that era. The deluxe package includes a custom gift box with a certificate of authenticity, leather card wallet, leather carrying case, and hickory watch box.

The watch retails for $1,500.00 and is available for purchase through and at Shinola stores.

For more information visit Shinola.”

  • Kyle Kelley

    I’d be into that 42!

  • Stuart Rosemurgy
    • John Watson

      my issues lie more within the fact that it is totally possible to actually machine your casings in the USA, instead they insist on using Chinese casings. There are now at least four companies in the US using either American-made casings or German made Ti casings. For the same pricepoint…

      • Stuart Rosemurgy

        True, yeah. The fact that its not entirely made in the USA is definitely a bummer. I’m living a little outside of Detroit, so my main issue with the company is the way they brand themselves with the sort of “Union Jobs” spirit the auto industry had in the 40’s and 50’s, right before Detroit’s decline, even though Shinola themselves don’t employ union workers. I don’t have a huge issue with them outside of those things. They make really cool-looking stuff, and they aren’t doing anything bad to Detroit. But, they aren’t really helping out either.