Go AWOL This Weekend Jul 20, 2013


Erik from The Great Escape has started a new blog for Specialized Europe, showcasing their new AWOL “adventure bike”, which is essentially a belt-drive, generator lamp, disc-tourer. Keep on top of the AWOL and Erik as he ventures into the Transcontinental Race.

I can’t wait to see more from this project!

  • adie.mitchell

    what are those panniers?


    • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

      I’m guessing something new from Specialized.

      • ElCapitaineDuderino

        Fatboy sport, not available in the US or UK yet. Any more miles on your set of resist nomads?

        • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

          That bike was stolen. I’ve been riding Jack Browns with 0 issues though.

          • ElCapitaineDuderino

            That is a big bag of bummer.

        • cory

          a little late on this one, but I’ve been riding resist Nomad 35s on my touring bike since April. At about 2000km with zero riding flats. Got a flat parked on small sharp piece of glass. Great value for a classic look and width.

    • btdubs

      Forget the panniers, what are those TIRES?

      • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

        Some new thing from Specialized I’m sure. Id still ride anything panaracer makes… Gran Bois, Riv, etc

  • Jamie McKeon

    tooooOOOO sick

  • Roger Dudek

    I’m envious, but I don’t get the tendency to load all the weight in the front. Seems like purely a stylistic choice.

    • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

      Front loading is the best on a mid to low trail bike. Loadin a bike in the rear makes the bike sway side to side way too much and descending is miserable. I’d say the worse thing you could do on a tour is put all your weight on the rear of a bike.

      • Roger Dudek

        I used a BOB trailer for my MA-OR-MA ride (8,050 miles in three months) and it handled like a champ. At one point I hit 50 mph, and my partner hit 54. I snapped a few spokes, but that was more due to using lightweight wheels. Far more aero than panniers too. And hanging stuff from the handlebars rather than using a lightweight rear rack? Just seems senseless.

        • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

          Again, try it before you knock it. Ignorance is even more senseless. ;-)
          I have tried both and will tell you that low and front loaded is the way to go.

        • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

          Also, why would you use “lightweight” wheels on a tour? Now THAT is senseless ;-)

          • Roger Dudek

            Yes, but it was all I had – a mountain bike with 32-spoke wheels. I wanted to spring for 36-hole wheels but didn’t have the money. Of course, when your wheel splits in half in the middle of Nowhere, Montana, you wish you’d found a way to get some.

          • Matthew J

            Adding to JW’s points, MTB ride is much different front low trail ride. I’ve toured both and come to prefer the latter (‘cepting if I’m touring off road that is)

  • brennan

    I can’t wait to see and ride one of these. After talking to my GM and Fitter, who have seen and ridden them, they seem to have high hopes and look like a pretty interesting option.

    Here is a link to a little more info on them:


  • Jason

    I’m freaking loving this frame! Such an interesting set-up!

  • Tyler Johnson

    These bikes are so sick.

  • Vincent

    Is there anywhere you’d advise to read up on the difference, pro’s/cons between front- and rear loading? I’d like to know more.

  • Polerstuff

    Cool to see them using the camera cooler, bummed on them covering our logo with dark side of the moon patch. ha.

  • Michael Schiller

    unfortunately the trail on the AWOL is like 64 mm. Which is not optimal for front loading. It needs to be more like 40-45mm to optimize the front loading capability. Nice try but no cigar.

    • http://theradavist.com/ John Watson

      No, it’s not. Nice try, but no cigar.

      • albeant

        According to Specialized, trail is 64mm, save the size small @ 71mm.

  • wunnspeed

    Is it a tourer or a bikepacking bike? If it’s tourer, than the panniers are o.k. Panniers are just heavy and cumbersome as well as a bitch when you’re trying to negotiate singletrack. If it’s a real bikepacking bike, then they should have bottle mounts, etc. instead of full rack mounts. Don’t get me wrong, the idea is cool, it just seems to need ‘refinement’ and a decision of which direction they want to take it. In either case, more mount locations is always better. Load-wise, they really should balance it out with a seat bag (SpoK Werks preferably… my brand) and top tube bags which are amazingly useful…. plus other things.